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Roll Call

The House

October 02, 1988

Drug Bill

By a vote of 375 for and 30 against, the House passed and sent to the Senate a bill (HR 5210) giving the government several new weapons to combat the nation's drug problem. The bill is aimed at domestic users and dealers and at foreign traffickers.

In part, the bill allows the death penalty for people convicted of drug-related murders, denies an array of federal benefits to drug criminals, legitimizes certain drug evidence obtained without search warrants and authorizes civil fines for drug users in addition to existing criminal penalties.

Although House members want to clear the bill before the 1988 congressional elections, the Senate may not cooperate. Congress is expected to adjourn for the year in mid-October.

Supporters termed the bill a necessarily tough approach to a worsening problem, while opponents said some of its provisions trample constitutional freedoms.

Members voting yes favored the bill.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) X Rep. Dornan (R) X Rep. Dreier (R) X Rep. Dymally (D) X Rep. Hawkins (D) X Rep. Martinez (D) X Rep. Torres (D) X

Driver's Licenses

By a vote of 281 for and 119 against, the House approved the softer of two pending proposals for inducing states to revoke driver's licenses of people convicted of drug-related criminal offenses. This occurred during debate on the omnibus drug bill.

The vote established federal grants for states denying driving privileges to drug offenders. It replaced a punitive proposal to take a percentage of federal highway funds away from states failing to revoke the licenses of drug criminals.

Members voting yes favored the softer of two proposals for denying driving privileges to drug criminals.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) X Rep. Dornan (R) X Rep. Dreier (R) X Rep. Dymally (D) X Rep. Hawkins (D) X Rep. Martinez (D) X Rep. Torres (D) X

AIDS Testing

By a vote of 266 for and 137 against, the House opted for the less comprehensive of two proposals for AIDS testing of prison inmates. This approved an amendment to test only inmates who have used drug needles or been convicted of sexual crimes. It replaced a proposal that all prisoners be tested for the acquired immune deficiency syndrome virus at the beginning and end of their confinement. The vote occurred as the House neared final passage of a bill (HR 5142) authorizing $400 million to help states upgrade AIDS programs.

Robert W. Kastenmeier (D-Wis.), who supported less extensive prison testing, said: "We cannot let legislative hysteria dictate AIDS policy."

Edward R. Madigan (R-Ill.) said all inmates need testing because "the percentage of prisoners practicing homosexual behavior is much greater than in the general population."

Members voting yes favored less extensive AIDS testing of prisoners.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) X Rep. Dornan (R) X Rep. Dreier (R) X Rep. Dymally (D) X Rep. Hawkins (D) X Rep. Martinez (D) X Rep. Torres (D) X

Premarital AIDS Testing

By a vote of 91 for and 304 against, the House rejected an amendment to the AIDS bill to induce states to require AIDS testing of marriage license applicants. Supporters called such testing necessary to slow the spread of AIDS, particularly to the newly born. Opponents said AIDS screening of those planning marriage would prove unfortunate when the test yields a false positive exposure. Members voting yes wanted states to begin AIDS testing of marriage license applicants.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) X Rep. Dornan (R) X Rep. Dreier (R) X Rep. Dymally (D) X Rep. Hawkins (D) X Rep. Martinez (D) X Rep. Torres (D) X

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