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Presidential Election

November 20, 1988

It will be very interesting watching the Democratic Party struggle with the problem which has prevented it from winning the White House the last three times.

The dichotomy of appealing to the white Southern voter without alienating their most reliable base of voters, the nation's black citizens, seems at first blush to be insurmountable.

Perhaps it is; however, the leaders of the party should not throw up their hands in despair.

Over the next four years the Democratic Party should initiate an educational effort to help Southern as well as many white Americans from every region of our nation to understand that they lose nothing when black Americans and other minorities are afforded full participation in the fruits of our society. They should attempt to illustrate to white Americans that the problems we all face are not a matter of black, brown, yellow or white, but rather a matter of justice versus injustice.

It was indeed sad watching Michael Dukakis attempting to utilize the Rev. Jesse Jackson in a manner which at least appeared to be cautious. The candidate was noticeably absent in black areas until it was desperation time.

What was even more obscene was the Republicans' continuous use of Willie Horton throughout the entire campaign. Anyone who was unable to identify that disgraceful episode in American politics as racism simply cannot or will not face reality.

This was not the first time the Republicans have used racism to win the presidency. The buzzword "welfare" is perceived by white America as a black phenomenon in spite of the fact that the overwhelming percentage of welfare recipients are white. Both Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan used "welfare" and other racial buzzwords throughout their campaigns.

Until the Democrats desensitize white Americans about racism, and make them realize that they are as much victims of an inequitable social system as blacks and other minorities, they will continue to be visitors to and not residents of the White House.

ROBERT W. WILLIAMS

Pasadena

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