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Kentucky Responds to Issues Raised by Crash Fatal to 27 : School Bus Tragedy Prompts New Look at Safety

May 21, 1989|From Associated Press

Lee Williams still will think of his family when he sees a bus. And he will continue to warn people of the danger.

"I give these speeches for the Robins and the Kristens who haven't been killed. I give these speeches for the husbands and the wives who haven't been hurt."

"That first anniversary is the toughest," Garnett said. "Just when you think you're getting a handle on it, you get ambushed . . . and that hole in your heart is as big as a canyon."

The memorial service was the last of three ceremonies Sunday, the first drawing several hundred people and the last two more than 1,000 apiece.

The first was the unveiling of a black granite monument at the cemetery where many of the victims were buried. Engraved on the monument are names of those who were aboard the bus.

The monument was unveiled by six children, including four crash survivors: Aaron Conyers, 16, Harold Dennis, 15, Carey Aurentz, 15, and Katrina Muller, 14. Two others were children of crash victims--John R. Pearman Jr., whose father drove the bus, and Charles J. Kytta III, whose father was youth minister at the church that owned the bus, Radcliff First Assembly of God.

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