Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

?Que pasa? : PEOPLE AND EVENTS

May 25, 1989|EDWARD J. BOYER

His fans include physicians, police officers, social workers. Listeners from Ventura to San Diego to Barstow tune in every Saturday between 6 p.m. and midnight for the mixture of Latin music and Chicano pride conveyed in doses of English, Spanish and street slang.

"The Sancho Show" has been a popular staple on Pasadena City College's listener-supported station, KPCC-FM (89.3), for the last five years, and the audience continues to grow. The show tells Latinos to "be proud of who you are, we care about you, you have a responsibility to your community," said Daniel Castro, a Pasadena real estate developer, known as Sancho on the air.

Castro adopted the character to combat the high Latino school dropout rate, and the show "strokes people who do well in any class," he said, "academic classes, Bible class, cosmetology class--anything."

Program directors at Spanish-language radio stations will select winners of the first Latin music awards (Premio Lo Nuestro a la Musica Latina). Co-sponsored by Billboard magazine and Univision, a Spanish-language television network, the awards will be presented in more than a dozen categories during a live broadcast May 31 on the network.

Cinco de Mayo in this country is representative of the Latino tradition and symbolic of Mexican-American pride, wrote Victor Raul Gomez in his winning essay. Gomez, a Belmont High 11th grader, was among the first place winners in the 8th annual Cinco de Mayo essay contest organized by the USC Office of Civic and Community Relations.

The other winners were Kelly J. Watson, of San Bernardino High, and, in the 7th to 9th grade category, Sonia Laura Perez, of Sacred Heart of Mary in Montebello, and Bezabeth Carrillo, of Memorial Academy in San Diego.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|