Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

The New Proportion

November 10, 1989|MARY ROURKE | TIMES FASHION EDITOR

Of all the new ideas in fashion for spring, 1990, the one most likely to make sense to most women has to do with proportion as much as any particular garment. It is a two-layer look, made of shorts, short skirts or easy fitting sheaths, all but covered by tunics, long jackets or cardigan coats. The silhouette is a favorite for spring among designers from New York to Paris and Milan.

It's often shown as a suit look, with a sarong, wrap or straight skirt topped by a long, fitted jacket. Office and evening variations depend on the fabrics. In New York, Donna Karan uses light weight wools in matching soft colors such as rose quartz, for day. Louis Dell'Olio for Anne Klein mixes sporty and luxury fabrics--light wool and silk georgette --for a day into evening alternative.

Weekend versions of the suit are made of shorts as often as skirts, in peppy plaids, tropical prints or both. Paris designer Claude Montana shows a dressier version of the shorts suit, worn without a blouse. In his signature collection, Italian designer Gianfranco Ferre shows an evening option, with beaded shorts and beaded details on the jacket.

Elongated vests replace jackets in some collections. Tunics take their place in others. New Yorker Carolyne Roehm shows an apron-like tunic with golden string-ties in back, over a narrow skirt.

Another new option begins with a sheath, body contoured or cut wider for a slide-off-the-shoulder effect. Most are shown under a flowing cardigan coat in a matching fabric, cut to the same or near same length.

Designers are putting their personal imprint on the popular silhouette. In New York, Donna Karan eliminates collars and cuffs for a streamlined effect. In Italy, Gianfranco Ferre encrusts his version in gold and jewels. And Giorgio Armani mixes subtle gradations of color.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|