Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Radiology

November 12, 1989

The recent spate of letters about programming changes at KFAC, KJOI, KEDG, KROQ, et al., is understandable but fruitless.

Today's theory (however misguided) among advertisers and ad agencies is that only people between the ages of 25 and 54 have money to spend on their products. Unless a station can show a predominance in that age group, it simply will not get the advertising it needs to survive.

The time-buyers at the ad agencies do all their selecting via computer, based on the latest Arbitron audience surveys. No consideration is given to the programming, station image, listener loyalty or any other factor. As far as Arbitron and the agencies are concerned, listeners aren't people--they're just numbers on the computer readout.

The stations, for their part, conduct "research" in attempts to determine what sort of programming will "target" the 25-to-54 listenership. Unfortunately, they all use the same kind of research, much of which is fallible if not spurious, and the result is a couple of dozen stations all programming the same thing.

As a veteran of 43 years in broadcasting, I find it disheartening to see stations in Los Angeles lacking the intestinal fortitude to devise new and exciting programming. Any experienced broadcaster will tell you that not one of the formats offered in the L.A. market originated here. They have been copied wholly or in part from creative programmers elsewhere. Often, L.A. radio is five or six years behind the programming trends in other parts of the country.

JON A. HOLIDAY

San Clemente

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|