Advertisement
(Page 2 of 2)

Convention Supports Prop. 42, but Makes Modification : NCAA: Partial qualifiers will be allowed to receive non-athletic scholarship aid in freshman year.

January 09, 1990|DANNY ROBBINS | TIMES STAFF WRITER

Said Young: "I can see where somebody might have been against Proposition 42 last January because of the (Prop. 48) study. But having adopted it, as Joe Paterno said, it would send the wrong message to back down now."

After approving the presidents' modification of Prop. 42, the delegates considered a measure, known as Proposition 38, designed to loosen the Prop. 48 standards by granting a fourth season of eligibility to athletes who had lost a year to Prop. 48 and then completed a minimum of 105 semester units toward a degree.

As it was written, Prop. 38 was designed to go into effect immediately and be retroactive--meaning that some Prop. 48 athletes who have just completed their eligibility and had even played in postseason all-star games could suddenly have received another year of eligibility.

Delegates at first approved Prop. 38 with relatively little debate. But then they reconsidered the issue and ultimately voted it down.

Paterno pointed out that some athletes who would benefit from the rule had already accepted money to play in all-star games, and Nebraska football Coach Tom Osborne argued that the rule would penalize those schools that had tried to steer away from recruiting athletes who don't qualify under Prop. 48.

NCAA Notes

Former President Ronald Reagan's acceptance of the NCAA's "Teddy" award came off without a hitch last night despite protests by some women involved in college athletics. Reagan accepted the award, named for former President Theodore Roosevelt and considered the highest honor that the NCAA can confer, at the honors dinner held in conjunction with the NCAA convention.

Former pro golfer Carol Mann reportedly resigned her seat on the awards committee in protest of the selection of Reagan, who has been criticized by some women for his lack of support for women's athletics. Donna Lopiano, women's athletic director at the University of Texas, had also criticized Reagan's selection. She did not attend the banquet because she had a prior engagement. But, because of Reagan's presence, she would not have come under any circumstances, she said.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|