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'Bogeyman' to Cap '90 LATC Season

April 10, 1990|SYLVIE DRAKE | TIMES THEATER WRITER

"Bogeyman," a new piece by Reza Abdoh, Mira-Lani Oglesby and the same creative team responsible for last year's "Minamata," will cap the second half of the 1990 season at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, which also will include two other new works, two modern classics and two musicals.

Ibsen's rarely staged "The Wild Duck" kicks things off July 12-Aug. 12, under the direction of Stein Winge, artistic director of the National Theatre of Oslo. It will have the same design team as "The Inspector General," Winge's most recent outing at the theater, including Pavel Dobrusky (sets) and Marianna Elliott (costumes).

"The American Popess," a one-person play set in a morally bankrupt 21st Century, will feature actress Nan Martin as a woman Pope, talking to her new flock about a return to basics from a rented TV studio. This work by German-Argentine playwright Esther Vilar will be staged by LATC consulting director Alan Mandell Aug. 16-Sept. 30.

Third in the line-up is an exploration of the life and death of Times reporter Ruben Salazar, accidentally shot to death during a police action in East Los Angeles Aug. 29, 1970. Developed collectively by LATC's Latino Theatre Lab (which has taken on the pseudonymous name Violeta Calles for the occasion), "August 29" will play Aug. 30-Oct. 14.

Arthur Miller's "The Crucible," about the Salem witch hunts, will be staged Sept. 6-Oct. 13 by LATC artistic director Bill Bushnell.

"The Joni Mitchell Project," commissioned by LATC from artistic associate David Schweizer ("Kingfish," "Demon Wine," "The Illusion") and writer Henry Edwards, looks at the last quarter century through 20 Mitchell songs (Nov.1-Dec. 16).

And "Blues in the Night," conceived and staged by New York director Sheldon Epps (a piece that has played London and New York), will examine the tribulations of three nameless women in a run-down hotel in the 1930s through songs of the '30s and '40s (Nov. 8-Dec. 23).

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