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ROLL CALL

The House

May 13, 1990

The 1991 Budget

By a vote of 218 to 208, the House approved a fiscal 1991 Democratic budget (HCR 310) that envisions about $1.24 trillion in spending and $1.18 trillion in revenue, and a $63.5-billion deficit. Authority for defense is $24 billion less than President Bush wants and actual military spending $8 billion less, with most of the savings applied to domestic social programs. The budget eventually sketched out by Congress will become its starting point in talks with the White House to set fiscal policy, including spending priorities and whether to raise taxes.

House Speaker Thomas S. Foley (D-Wash.) said the House budget reflects world changes as the Soviet empire breaks apart.

Minority Whip Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.) said Democrats are "once again melting down defense."

A yes vote supported the Democratic budget.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dornan (R) x Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Hawkins (D) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

Supercollider Appropriation

By a vote of 309 to 109, the House sent to the Senate a bill (HR 4380) authorizing an additional $5 billion for developing the Energy Department's superconducting supercollider near Dallas-Ft. Worth. The money will pay most of the cost of building the 54-mile oval tunnel, where high-speed particle collisions would help scientists better understand matter and energy. Supporter Martin Frost (D-Tex.) called the project "a golden opportunity" to advance America in science.

Opponent Howard Wolpe (D-Mich.) said it poses "simply too many unanswered questions," including ones of cost.

A yes vote supported supercollider funding.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dornan (R) x Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Hawkins (D) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

Supercollider Refund

By a vote of 256 to 163, the House adopted an amendment to HR 4380 (above) eliminating the possibility of a supercollider refund for Texas. The Treasury was to have repaid Texas' $1-billion contribution if the $8-billion project were canceled before October, 1995.

Amendment sponsor James F. Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.) noted Texas did not raise the refund issue while bidding for the coveted federal project.

Tom DeLay (R-Tex.) said the bidding process is distinct from the later phase of putting a contract in place.

A yes vote opposed any refund to Texas.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Anderson (D) x Rep. Dornan (R) x Rep. Dreier (R) x Rep. Dymally (D) x Rep. Hawkins (D) x Rep. Martinez (D) x Rep. Torres (D) x

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