Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Critics' Picks

May 20, 1990|Kevin Thomas | Noteworthy films, with mini-reviews by Times critics

Fitzcarraldo (TNT Sunday at 7 p.m.): Werner Herzog's fabulous, one-of-a-kind 1982 movie, the logical, inevitable expression of Herzog's obsession with the extremes of human experience, stars Klaus Kinski as an eccentric, opera-loving ne'er-do-well speculator determined to get a steamboat over an isthmus in the Amazon jungle in a fevered attempt to cash in on a Peruvian rubber boom early in this century.

Peggy Sue Got Married (KTLA Monday at 8 p.m.): This 1986 Francis Coppola film is one of his best, an irresistible nostalgic fantasy in which small-town girl Kathleen Turner, on the eve of her 25th high school reunion, is propelled back in time a quarter of a century but with her contemporary awareness intact. With Nicolas Cage.

Bagdad Cafe (TMC Friday at 4 p.m.): You've seen the series, now see the original 1988 Percy Adlon movie, an adorable comic fable set in a ramshackle motel-restaurant on the edge of the Mojave Desert and featuring a triumphant teaming of the Rubenesque Marianne Sagebrecht and the formidable CCH Pounder.

Seven Beauties (KCET Saturday at 10 p.m.): One of the key films of the '70s, this Lina Wertmuller picture stars Giancarlo Giannini as the foppish proprietor of a mattress-repair works, a ludicrous Everyman who is Buster Keaton and Rudolph Valentino rolled into one--and who ends up in a Nazi concentration camp. What emerges from Giannini's harrowing odyssey is a darkly comic, richly grotesque parable suggesting forcibly that humanity's only hope for freedom is in chaos.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|