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By the Twilight's Last Screaming : Baseball: Roseanne Barr spit on the ground after fans booed her shrill rendition of the national anthem.

July 26, 1990|From Associated Press

SAN DIEGO — Roseanne Barr made an obscene gesture and spit on the ground after she was booed at a San Diego Padres game for a shrill rendition of the national anthem in front of 30,000 baseball fans.

The comedienne and star of ABC's "Roseanne" appeared to struggle Wednesday night with an echo from the sound system as she sang between games of a doubleheader with the Cincinnati Reds, said Ron Seaver, the Padres' promotions director.

Barr plugged her ears with her fingers at the start of the song, then sang in a shrill voice. After the boos began, Barr reached toward her crotch and spit on the ground.

Barr's husband, Tom Arnold, later made a ceremonial pitch with no reaction, but Barr got more boos as she waved to the crowd and left with him.

"The Padres understand that many people were concerned about Roseanne Barr's rendition of the national anthem," Seaver said. "She was doing the best she could under the circumstances of the audio delay and she certainly meant no disrespect to the national anthem."

Barr said she was pleased with her performance.

"I think I did great and people wanted more," she told a reporter for KFMB-TV before leaving the field. Asked about the boos, she said, "Yeah, well, just because they weren't up front."

At least two Padres players were upset by her singing, spitting and gesturing.

"I was embarrassed as a person and I was embarrassed for them (the Padres)," said Padres pitcher Eric Show, who was on the field. "I can't believe it happened. It's an insult. There are people who died for that song."

Said Padres outfielder Tony Gwynn: "I thought it was a disgrace. When they said she was going to sing the national anthem I thought something like this was going to happen."

The Associated Press called Barr's publicist in Los Angeles on Wednesday and left a message requesting comment. The call was not immediately returned.

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