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Maurice Sendak

November 04, 1990

I've been a librarian in a public library for almost 20 years ("The Dark World of Maurice Sendak," by Paul Ciotti, Sept. 16). In my experience the only Sendak book that children consistently ask for is "Where the Wild Things Are." Much of his other work seems to attract more adult attention because the illustrations are puzzling and enigmatic and hint at a darker side to life. I have always assumed that the sexual symbolism was read into his work by anxious adults, but after reading this article I'm not so sure.

Sendak is, however, an entertaining and amusing speaker. When I saw him in a program with Dr. Seuss in San Diego and at Simmons College in Boston, he came across as a dedicated professional, wholly immersed in the world of art and music and very possibly difficult to work with because he is a consummate perfectionist.

Your article was particularly intriguing because he seemed to reveal more of himself than he usually does, and maybe even more than some of us wanted to know.

TERESA SHEEHEY

Buena Park

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