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Bright Nights

November 25, 1990|BARBARA FOLEY

Evening wear, the last bastion of black-only elegance, is finally brightening up. Fashion designers have created a full rainbow of designs guaranteed to compete with even that infamous little black dress.

"Last year, stores and customers wanted color, but no stores carried it," says Louisa Nevins, who designs her own division of evening wear for Jane Singer. "Color is just more fun to wear. In black, you simply drown in the sea of tuxedos."

There's no chance of blending into the crowd if you're wearing chrome yellow, tangerine, fuchsia, red or "Jordan Almond" green. Fluttering chiffon, slinky jersey, shiny taffeta and satin--plain or embellished with beading and embroidery--give these pop colors their elegance. Stores are filled with accessories that back up the bold tones: brightly colored shoes, handbags, scarfs and jewelry. Some will want to dive into color wholeheartedly. Others can test the effect with accessories, adding them to the familiar basic--black.

"We've always shown a lot of color because we're in young, spirited Beverly Hills," says Fred Hayman of his namesake store on Rodeo Drive. "Color makes you feel happier."

Stylist: Michael Eisenhower; hair: Daniel Howell / Celestine; makeup: Jeanne Townsend / Celestine; models: Hillary Young / Prima and Peta Wilson / Bordeaux

For the Record
Los Angeles Times Sunday January 6, 1991 Home Edition Westside Part J Page 3 Column 2 Zones Desk 3 inches; 81 words Type of Material: Correction
House remodeling--A Westside story on Nov. 29, 1990, about the end of a four-year effort by neighbors to stop a homeowner from remodeling his home on Adelaide Drive in Los Angeles incorrectly stated that the homeowner, Peter Olmstead, lost his appeal of a ruling by a city zoning administrator. In fact, the city Board of Zoning Appeals ruled in his favor. The story also incorrectly stated that Olmstead lost an appeal in a related lawsuit filed by his next-door neighbors. The court refused to hear the appeal because only a partial ruling on the suit had been made by the lower court.

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