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Westside Digest

Culver City : Zoning Code Changes OKd

November 29, 1990

The Culver City Council approved several changes in zoning codes Monday that will affect new construction of apartment complexes. The changes include reducing some height limits, increasing the number of parking spaces per unit, and mandating open space for larger complexes and private outdoor space for smaller apartment complexes.

The 3-2 vote approving the changes also maintains current density regulations that limit large R-3 complexes to 15 units per acre and smaller R-4 buildings to 29 units per acre, with a further limitation of nine units per lot.

Mayor Steven Gourley and Councilman James Boulgarides, who were in favor of reducing the number of units allowed per lot, voted against the measure. Council members Paul Jacobs, Jozelle Smith and Mike Balkman voted in favor.

"This does not solve that problem (of high density housing)," said Gourley, who noted that the purpose of having the Planning Commission review the code regulations was to prevent such high density housing. "Maybe it couldn't. Maybe it was an impossible task. But because of that, I can't support it."

Among the code revisions the council approved, the height limit and parking requirements are most significant. Buildings in R-3a and R-4 zones will be scaled back from 35 feet to 30 feet, or two stories.

Developers will be required to provide two parking spaces for each one-bedroom apartment, 2 1/2 spaces for a two-bedroom apartment, and 3 1/2 spaces for a three-bedroom apartment.

Larger R-3 complexes will now have to provide at least 30% of a project as open space. Smaller R-4 buildings will have no open space requirement, but they will instead have to provide 70 square feet per unit of private outdoor space, such as balconies, patios or decks.

Other revisions deal with formulas for determining front, rear and side setbacks, landscaping for side setbacks, and a requirement for a storage area for each unit of 78 cubic feet.

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