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YOU ASKED ABOUT

Hold the Mayo?

December 06, 1990|JOAN DRAKE | TIMES FOOD MANAGING EDITOR

Question: I know the government has advised against using raw eggs due to salmonella danger. Because of this, I can no longer make blender mayonnaise. I'm wondering, however, whether the commercially prepared mayonnaise that I use is safe. Is the egg used in their formulation cooked?

Answer: Yes, the eggs in commercially prepared mayonnaise are cooked, eliminating the danger from yolks that may have been contaminated with Salmonella enteritidis.

In response to the Sept. 20 You Asked About . . . column, which did not recommend canning figs, several readers sent in recipes they claim do not result in a mushy end product. Here is a typical one from C. Carman of Altadena to tuck away until next season. Carman adds that the unusual "sweet-sour" taste makes the figs an excellent relish accompaniment to meats.

PICKLED SWEET-SOUR

FIGS

6 quarts figs

Salt

8 cups dark brown sugar, packed

1 quart cider vinegar

7 (3-inch) sticks cinnamon

1 to 2 teaspoons whole cloves

Wash figs and place in 8-quart or larger sauce pot. Cover with water, measuring and adding 1 tablespoon salt for each gallon. Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer 15 minutes.

Combine brown sugar and vinegar in another sauce pot and bring to boil. Add cinnamon and cloves.

Drain figs well and return to sauce pot. Pour boiling syrup over drained figs. Simmer 1 hour.

Pack figs into hot, sterilized canning jars. Cover with syrup. Adjust caps according to manufacturer's directions. Process in boiling water bath 15 minutes. Makes 7 to 8 pints.

Note: Figs should be ripe enough to yield to slight pressure, but not burst open. If cinnamon sticks vary in length, add amount equal to 21 inches.

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