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FLICKS FILM & VIDEO FILE : Foreign Flavors : Offerings from Norway and Russia will be shown on a couple screens in the county this month.

February 07, 1991|LEO SMITH | TIMES STAFF WRITER

There will be an international theme on a couple of Ventura County movie screens in coming weeks.

First, the Ojai Film Society will show the 1989 Norwegian film "Pathfinder," set about 1,000 years ago in an area of Norway that was known as Lapland.

Based an an ancient Lapp legend, it's the story of a teen-age boy who returns home from a hunting trip to find that a tribe of warriors has killed his family and is in the process of ransacking the settlement. He attempts to hide from the warriors, but is eventually caught and forced to lead them through the snow in search of other Laplanders. Secretly, however, the boy has a plan to save the day.

"Pathfinder" is the only feature film ever produced in the Lapp language. It received an academy award nomination for best foreign film.

Showtime 4:30 p.m. Sunday at the Ojai Playhouse.

From Norway, it's on to Russia.

Feb. 16, the Thousand Oaks Library Classic Cinema series will continue with a showing of the 1959 film "The Cranes Are Flying," winner of a Cannes Film Festival grand prize for best picture.

It's a World War II love story about a girl whose boyfriend leaves her to join the army. She falls in love with the boy's cousin and marries him, but things fall apart after the war and she must put her life back together.

In addition to the best picture award, Mikhail Kalatozov earned a Cannes award for best director and Tatyana Samoilova earned one for best actress. The film is in black and white with subtitles.

Showtime is 7 p.m. at the Thousand Oaks Library.

Sneak Preview: Valentine's Day is one week from today. That means next week's column will feature a list of love-related videos you might want to watch with your sweetheart. Here's one to get you started:

"Love Slaves of the Amazon" (1957), starring Don Taylor, Gianna Segale, Eduardo Ciannelli and Harvey Chalk.

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