Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

ROLL CALL

The House

May 02, 1991

The 1992 Budget

By a vote of 261 to 163, the House approved a fiscal 1992 budget plan drafted by Democrats that anticipates outlays of $1.46 trillion, revenue of $1.16 trillion and a deficit of about $290 billion. Specific program budgets for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1 will be set by later action on individual spending bills.

The projected deficit would be many billions higher if "off-budget" items such as borrowing to pay for the savings and loan cleanup were included in the red ink tally. Also, whether the projection proves accurate depends largely on the performance of the economy.

In part, the budget (HCR 121) earmarks $624 billion for entitlement programs, $295.3 billion for military spending, $211.9 billion for domestic discretionary spending, $209.8 billion for interest on the national debt and $17.9 billion for foreign aid.

Compared with President Bush's 1992 budget, which the House rejected, 89 to 335, the Democratic plan would spend more on Medicare, veterans' benefits and other entitlements, reject a cut in the capital gains tax rate and increase education spending at the expense of science and law enforcement.

A yes vote supported the budget plan.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Moorhead (R) x Rep. Roybal (D) x Rep. Waxman (D) x

To End Strike

By a vote of 400 to 5, the House approved legislation to end an hours-old nationwide rail strike. Although not imposing a settlement, the bill (HJR 222) set up a panel to make binding recommendations on issues that unions and railroads cannot resolve in renewed talks. The most intractable disputes are over work rules such as crew size and the number of miles traveled in a day's work.

The Senate passed the bill on a non-record vote and President Bush signed it into law.

A yes vote was to end the rail strike.

How They Voted Yea Nay No vote Rep. Moorhead (R) x Rep. Roybal (D) x Rep. Waxman (D) x

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|