Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Our Hall of Flame

May 09, 1991|BARBARA HANSEN

RAJA

Indian food is spicy, but not necessarily hot, because too much chile would mask the mellow blend of seasonings that is the hallmark of the cuisine. One exception is the north Indian lamb dish, roghan josh . At Raja, proprietor Narinder Dhawan will escalate the heat of the lamb to any degree requested, but the flavor remains rich and full thanks to the carefully orchestrated spicing. Even the hot effect comes from a variety of sources--fresh and dried chiles, cayenne pepper, black pepper and ginger.

8875 W. Pico Blvd., Los Angeles, (213) 550-9176.

YEE JOH KOREAN RESTAURANT

Yee Joh's kimchi casserole--kimchi cooked with water, tofu and pork slices served in a black stone bowl--is so hot most people can't handle it. On the menu, it's called kim chi jigae.

2500 West 8th St., Los Angeles, (213) 380-3346.

SUKOTHAI

Carrot salad isn't listed on the menu here, but it's always available. The degree of heat can vary. Once it was exceptionally hot, due to an overabundance of serrano chiles--and almost burned up my mouth.

2801 W. Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, (213) 480-8743 or (213) 380-6290.

SIRI LANKA CURRY HOUSE

Sri Lankan food is notoriously hot, and this curry house's deviled shrimp upholds that reputation. The heat comes from jalapeno chiles, chili powder, crushed dry chiles and ginger. The dish is also made with beef, pork or chicken.

1308 N. Highland Ave., Los Angles, (213) 466-8238.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|