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FASHION : A Sight for Four Eyes : Specs Take on New Shapes, Bold Patterns for '92; Some Stems Even Do the Twist

January 10, 1992|CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS

There is actually something new in eyewear for spring. Innovative design and physical comfort are behind the latest trends. Beginning with the fall International Vision Expo in Anaheim, an eyewear show held for professionals twice a year, some unexpected shapes and sizes have been attracting attention.

* Shapes: Frames are narrow and often almond or rectangular. Round, '60s-inspired styles are the second most popular option. Cats-eyes, seen as sunglasses in recent years, are making inroads as daytime wear.

* Temple interest: The temples, or stems, of glasses are attracting extra attention. They are twisted, hand painted, tinted or coated with overlays. The Adolfo A-700 series for Liberty Optical features French frames with intricate, hand-applied lacquered enamel, which almost takes on a mosaic effect.

* Patterns: Intricate color and pattern combinations account for one of the most innovative updates for 1992. The Logo Paris company offers a custom coloring service that will match frames to any fabric swatch, even plaid or polka-dots. Prices for such personalized service range from $250 to $500. There are ready-to-wear checkerboard styles, found in the Audrey frames from Mary McFadden's collection for Renaissance, that are equally kinetic and eye catching.

* Fit: Comfort comes into sharper focus for '92. Killy Technical Eyewear, founded by Olympic snow skier Jean-Claude Killy, offers "frame for action" for athletic types. A patented sliding bumper nosepiece and rotation-action "hinges" prevent breakage during tough falls on the slopes. The En Vue L'Air Collection of frames by L'Amy of Paris feature non-slip silicone pads, ultra-slender stainless steel rims and streamlined temples.

* Finish: Matte-finish color frames, in such lightweight metals as titanium, a tarnish-resistant "anodized" aluminum, are also making news. Titanium weighs about 25% less than other metals used for frames. Anyone who wears glasses knows that less is more when it comes to the weight of spectacles.

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