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FASHION: What's Smart for Spring? : Awash in Waves and Wisps : A Softer Version of Last Year's Short Style Is the Kindest Cut for a Graceful Grow-Out

February 26, 1992|PADDY CALISTRO

Last year's short, precision haircuts that cost a bundle to maintain have given way to softer, economy-minded 'dos. Designed to grow out gracefully, the styles look good weeks after the initial cut.

That's the recession-fighting strategy from Beverly Hills hairdresser Cristophe, the last person we'd expect to talk about saving money--he charges $200 the first cut, $150 after that. But everything is relative, says Cristophe, whose Beverly Hills salon bears his name. "Whether you pay $8 for a cut or $200, if the cut lasts longer, it helps your budget."

The new wavy styles easily begin where those worn a year ago by supermodel Linda Evangelista or actress Ali MacGraw left off. Those tapered bowl cuts need constant trims to keep eyes, ears and neck properly exposed.

Cristophe suggests that clients who have one of last year's short cuts let their hair grow for six weeks before having it layered and finished with a razor for all-over wisps. He then administers a soft body-wave set with large pin curls instead of rods. "This softens the whole line of the hair and encourages movement," he says. For women intent on growing out their hair, "this is the perfect style because it works at all lengths."

Women can forgo the perm and add extra bounce to short, medium or long hair with a few strategically placed pin curls secured with clips or, yes, by inserting a few rollers. Cristophe uses Velcro rollers that need no pins. (Last weekend, he reports, clients bought 400 packages of the $2.99 sticky curlers.)

Also very important to the look: Sweeping thick bangs off the face to call attention to the thinner, arched brows that are the mode this spring. Bangs brushed back or to the side form romantic waves reminiscent of the late '40s and early '50s.

This less-bang-for-the-buck approach means fewer trims, or, as Cristophe puts it, "You can stay away from the hairdresser for at least two months."

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