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DO-IT-YOURSELF : Repairs From the Ground Up

February 29, 1992|From Associated Press

Consumers who take care of their resilient flooring will see it last a long time. If problems should arise, Do It Yourself magazine offers these tips:

* Occasionally the edge of a resilient floor tile curls or lifts as a result of moisture seepage or a weak adhesive. If moisture is the culprit, first dry the damaged tile and surrounding tiles, using a hand-held hair dryer or heat gun. Applying heat also softens the flooring so that it becomes pliable enough to work with.

Once it's softened, pry up the tile with a putty knife and dry the underlying damp area. Also scrape off old adhesive or dirt that may prevent the tile from lying smoothly. When the area is clean, spread a thin layer of adhesive under the tile, then press flat. Weigh it down overnight while the adhesive sets.

* Sometimes tiles bubble in the center, usually as a result of worn-out adhesive or moisture. Soften the area with heat; slice through the blister with a utility knife. Scrape or dry the underlying area, add new adhesive, and press flat. Weigh down until dry.

* To replace damaged tile, soften it with heat; cut around the edges of the tile using a straight edge and a sharp knife. Scrape the area smooth and vacuum thoroughly. Spread adhesive. Butt one side of the new tile against the edge of a neighboring tile, gently curling the tile as it is lowered into place. Press firmly, and apply weight overnight. This technique also works for sheet flooring with a unified pattern.

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