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Prime-Time Flicks

June 07, 1992|KEVIN THOMAS

In Coal Miner's Daughter (KCOP Sunday at 8 p.m.) Sissy Spacek is a luminous Loretta Lynn; the heart of this 1980 movie about the country music star is her relationship with her husband, played with strength and humor by Tommy Lee Jones.

In Jonathan Kaplan's terrific, exciting 1983 Heart Like a Wheel (KTTV Monday at 8 p.m.) Bonnie Bedelia is splendid as Shirley Muldowney, a blue-collar woman who became a champion car racer and who had a tumultuous romance with another racer, played as a disarming heartbreaker by Beau Bridges. It's a lovely film.

The Color of Money (ABC Monday at 8:30 p.m.), Martin Scorsese's 1986 sequel to "The Hustler," teams seasoned Paul Newman with brash contender Tom Cruise in Cruise's quest for pool table championship; a terrific in-the-American-grain picture until its inexplicably miscalculated finish.

Directed by Richard Fleischer, Tough Enough (KTLA Tuesday at 8 p.m.) is a highly appealing 1983 release in which Dennis Quaid stars as a struggling country singer-composer living in Fort Worth who joins a Toughman Contest, that amateur boxing phenomenon that the swept the hinterlands in the early '80s.

Savage Steve Holland's 1986 One Crazy Summer (KCOP Tuesday at 8 p.m.; again Saturday at 6 p.m.) is a zesty hot-weather tonic, light and sparkling, in which Holland actually finds fresh approaches to the youth comedy. John Cusack stars as an aspiring animator pondering his future while off to Nantucket for the summer, and Demi Moore is the film's stunning damsel in distress.

Lesley Ann Warren is great fun to watch as a cold-blooded vixen in the 1991 TV movie A Seduction in Travis County (CBS Tuesday at 9 p.m.); she throws herself at her defense attorney (Peter Coyote) and plans the murder of his wife (Jean Smart) because she's in the way of her romantic designs.

In Born on the Fourth of July (CBS, Saturday at 8 p.m.), Oliver Stone turned anti-war activist Ron Kovic (Tom Cruise) into an idealized figure in Stone's furious moral lesson on the macho-American mentality that led us to Vietnam. When the film needs to lower its voice and make crucial points clear, Stone unfortunately turns up the volume; his passionate pyrotechnics touch your heart rather than your mind.

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