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The Justice System and Role of a Judge

June 14, 1992

In rebuttal to Judge Robert O. Young's letter (Times, June 7), I would like to say that I do not share his obvious fascination with Abraham Aponte Khan, defeated Citrus Court judge.

Having on various occasions had the opportunity to view Khan in his judicial role, I am amazed he had the gall to accept pay under the pretense of public servant. People were ordered to be at his court by 8:30 a.m., then the doors were opened around 9. Usually, King Khan would make his appearance around 9:45, or at times later, sit on the bench for 45 minutes or one hour and then call a recess.

His chain-smoking seemed to control the pace of his overcrowded court rather than the need for a speedy trial. His total disrespect for people that appeared before him was obvious by the time he spent in chambers while an overcrowded gallery sat and waited.

Robert O. Young's statements were so bigoted and ignorant about Khan being defeated because of his name that I hope no one I know has to ever appear before Young, no matter how trivial the offense. I would not vote for Robert O. Young just because he shares a name with a famous actor, any more than I would vote against Abraham Khan because he has an "ethnic-sounding name."

This soon after the recent problems in South-Central Los Angeles, I question Young pouring more fuel on the L.A. fires by implying that Khan's defeat was because his name "characterized him as an ethnic minority," rather than due to the fact that Khan was lackadaisical in his duties.

WILLIAM COTTENAzusa

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