Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Arkoff: The Covenant

August 09, 1992

I'm shocked that the film critic for a major newspaper would dare express as prejudiced a viewpoint as that stated by Kenneth Turan in his review of Sam Arkoff's "Flying Through Hollywood by the Seat of My Pants" (July 12).

His statement that Arkoff employed "bleary veterans" and "talented young people" emulates one of Hollywood's worst traits--that human beings are disposable and easily replaced. At what age does one lose one's talent and become bleary?

Furthermore, if one is to go by the dictionary definition of "bleary" (dull or dimmed . . . tired to the point of exhaustion), it hardly applies to Vincent Price. Price had been a skilled supporting actor for years, but he was hardly a household word when he began his series of horror films for American-International. His unique talent shone brighter than ever and he became a true star for the first time in his career. With Arkoff, he didn't make a comeback, he hit a new peak.

As for Peter Lorre, Anna Sten and the other veterans used by Arkoff, he merely rescued them from years of neglect. It was no reflection on their ability that they found it hard to get a job, but rather on the industry itself. To call them bleary and to compare them unfavorably to such "talented young people" as the inexperienced Nick Nolte and Don Johnson, is both insulting and ignorant.

ALAN EICHLER

HOLLYWOOD

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|