Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

THEATER REVIEW / 'ROBIN HOOD' : A Musical Debut : The youthful cast uses broadswords, not bows and arrows, and there's no sheriff in sight. But it's a fun show for kids.

August 13, 1992|TODD EVERETT | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Robin Hood and his Merry Men are holding forth in Camarillo in an assemblage that you will and won't recognize. But if you have a family with children between about 6 and 15 years old, the trip might be worth your while.

The musical "Robin Hood," by Winnie Flynn--a Pittsburgh, Penn.-based writer and producer--is receiving its West Coast debut in performance by the Camarillo Youth Theater group, whose on- and offstage personnel are all under 21 years old.

This "Robin" unites several familiar characters--Robin, Maid Marian, King John, Allan-a-Dale, and so on--but there's no Sheriff of Nottingham here and not a longbow in sight: These Merry Men fight with broadswords.

The casting is generally excellent, with Ryan Ingrassia and Marin Ireland a particularly appealing Robin and Marian, and John Lordan an imposing Little John. Using a female--Elizabeth MacDonald--as Friar Tuck results in a fairly unconventional interpretation of the character, something like the Wicked Witch from "Snow White."

Flynn's script is amusing, and well-served by the cast.

Directors Leah Florence and Jayme Housh handle their actors well, with Florence music-directing the several serviceable songs. The live musical accompaniment is credited to Kevin Parcher and Larry English.

The set uses a backdrop from an old Camarillo Community Theater production of "Camelot"; costumes were devised and executed by the cast.

* WHERE AND WHEN

"Robin Hood" continues Friday and Saturday nights through Aug. 22 at the Camarillo Airport Theater, 330 Skyway Drive on the Camarillo Airport grounds. Performances are at 7:30 p.m.; tickets are $5 for adults (12 and older, by the group's definition), or $3.50 for children and seniors 60 or older. For reservations or further information, call 388-5716.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|