Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Inspection Misused

October 04, 1992

As a home inspector for over 12 years, I have seen a negative pattern develop among home buyers. They are being allowed to abuse the inspection report by using it as a "repair" list for sellers/current owners. It is not a fix-it list! Its intent is to be a "current status" report, an in-depth disclosure of an existing home.

If there are major problems discovered at the home, then by all means backing out or renegotiating is in order. All too often I have written reports with no major problems, but the buyer expects the seller to fix or "bring up to code" several or all of the minor considerations.

A missing window screen or unlockable bathroom door should not be reasonable cause to possibly destroy a deal with such positives as good school district, view or convenient location. Hairline driveway cracks, leaning fence posts, or non-weatherstripped doors should not diminish the advantages in fully operational mechanical systems and solid structural integrity of the home.

Save your demands for leaky roofs, plumbing problems, electrical hazards, non-operational heating and cooling apparatus, and crumbling foundations.

Real estate agents need to guide their clients in the right direction and not let the buyers take charge. It is through the agent's experience and transaction knowledge that the home sale stays active.

Let's use the physical home inspection in a reasonable way. Major problems, of course, need to be dealt with properly. Minor and incidental items should be considered "disclosure" but not "leverage" to take advantage of the seller's pocketbook. You jeopardize losing the big picture: a fine investment.

BOB CHERRY, Big Bear City

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|