Advertisement
 
(Page 2 of 2)

Transitional U.N. Rule for Somalia Advocated : Peacekeeping: Bush Administration seeks agreement on move that would follow military action.

December 03, 1992|DOYLE McMANUS and ROBIN WRIGHT | TIMES STAFF WRITERS

The draft resolution is vague about what will happen to the present U.N. peacekeeping operation. The council had authorized a force of 3,500 soldiers. Only 500--all Pakistani troops--are now in Mogadishu. And Boutros-Ghali ordered a halt Wednesday to the movement of 750 Canadian troops who were on their way to Somalia.

A U.S. amphibious strike force carrying about 1,800 Marines arrived off the Somalian coast Wednesday and is awaiting the go-ahead from the United Nations. The group would be the first unit of a U.S. force of 12,000 to 16,000 that would carry out the Somalia operation.

In Cambodia, the United Nations set up a special Supreme National Council that embraces all the major political factions in the country but essentially is overseen by the United Nations and its representatives. Besides dealing with day-to-day governing, the U.N. team in Cambodia is working to build a stable--and hopefully long-lasting--Cambodian-run government.

But officials conceded that the Cambodian model has not yet succeeded and is not without problems.

Murtha's remarks took the capital by surprise. Most other key lawmakers--including Rep. Les Aspin (D-Wis.) and Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Ga.), chairmen of the House and Senate armed services committees--have been relatively silent on the issue.

Times staff writers Art Pine in Washington and Stanley Meisler at the United Nations contributed to this report.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|