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ASK THE HANDYMAN / JOHN MORELL

Brush, Roller Create Different Textures

February 06, 1993|JOHN MORELL

Question: We recently painted our wood-paneled den with a latex, high-gloss white paint. In the areas where we cut in with a brush, the finish seems glossier than in the areas where we used a roller. Does the rolled area have a coat of paint that's too thin to be glossy?

R.Y.

Mission Viejo

Answer: "If you're used to the gloss of oil-based enamels, you should know that latex enamels don't have the same amount of gloss," says Charlie K. of Tustin Paint Mart. "You're probably also seeing what's called 'picture framing,' where the brush is sliding the paint on and creates a different texture than the roller. You might want to try using an oil-based glossy enamel for the final coat. Cut in with a brush and then concentrate on using the roller as far past the cutting edge as possible to create as uniform a finish as possible."

Q: I recently laid a new vinyl floor in my den, which made me realize how deeply bowed my walls are. I've got to put molding around the floor to finish it, but won't I be damaging the molding when it's forced to bend to fit the wall?

F.G.

Fullerton

A: "There are flexible baseboards and shoe moldings you can use that will fit the contour of the wall," says Jamie O'Connor of World of Moulding in Santa Ana. "You can also split the difference by not hammering the molding all the way into the wall and caulking the gap that's created. If the wall is bowed any more than a base shoe molding would bend, the wall may need to be torn down and put up again correctly."

Q: I've got a slow bathtub drain and, in trying to fix it, I'm having problems getting the bathtub stopper hardware out. I've tried pulling up on it and turning it, but nothing works. Any suggestions?

E.W.

Santa Ana

A: "With the most common stopper, there are two screws connected to the overflow with a lever that operates the stopper," says Rod Albright of Albright Plumbing and Heating in Los Alamitos. "To remove that, you undo the screws and pull everything out through the overflow. Once you do that, you can run your snake through the overflow, which is more effective than just running it down the drain. Usually, slow bathtub drains are caused by hair, which isn't hard to remove. Sulfuric acid can be used to burn it out, as long as you're careful with it and use a funnel so it doesn't splash, and wear gloves and safety glasses."

Q: I have magnetic closers on my kitchen cabinets that keep the doors closed. However, I'm worried that in case of a big earthquake, they'll fly open and all my dishes will break. What else can I use that would be simple to install?

D.E.C.

Laguna Hills

A: "A good magnetic latch is one of the most secure ways to keep the doors closed," says Marcus Molina of Martenet Hardware in Anaheim. "If you're really concerned about the doors, you can install the 'child-proof' latches that keep the doors closed, but they're not as easy to open as the magnetic latches are. You might also use a double magnetic latch, which will be stronger than a single latch and give you added protection in an earthquake."

Q: I accidentally left a hot plate on a piano bench. The cloudy white film left on the finish won't come out. What can I use to get this out?

T.T.

Laguna Beach

A: "There's a product found in hardware and wood finishing stores made by Jasco that might do the job," says David Moyes of Moyes Custom Furniture Refinishing in Anaheim. "This occurs when the finish coat is melted by the heat from the plate and moisture is trapped underneath. This product gets into the finish and lets the moisture escape. Getting it out successfully will depend on how worn the lacquer or urethane finish is, and how much damage was caused by the hot plate."

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