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Decision '93 / A LOOK AT THE ELECTION IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY : The Issues

April 11, 1993

On these pages, the 11 leading candidates give their views on the local economy, racial tension, gangs, higher taxes for more police officers. . . They also respond to questions on gun control, the city's homelessness, mass transit, the city budget and where they would look for new revenue.

* Nate Holden

* QUESTION 1:

If you are elected mayor, what will be your first important official action?

I'll announce my choice for economic liaison and expand the Economic Development Department operating out of the mayor's office. I'll implement the L.A. Manpower Project program to give young people a chance at decent jobs and wages. I'd form a crime commission of top law enforcement officers to attack L.A.'s crime problem.

QUESTION 2:

Do you have a plan for improving the city's economy? If so, please describe it briefly.

Yes. 1. Large corporations will be the cornerstone; they have cash and problem-solving ability. 2. Greater emphasis must be placed on attracting and keeping small businesses. 3. The community is most important. I'll bring together tenants, property owners, religious leaders, activists and others to activate volunteerism and resurrect neighborhoods.

QUESTION 3:

Do you have a plan for reducing racial and ethnic tensions in Los Angeles? If so, please describe it.

The single most important solution to our racial troubles is communication, which includes understanding one another's concerns. I'll sponsor and use community ombudsman programs on the neighborhood level to deal with community sore points and give badly needed input to City Hall. We have to start with the neighborhoods the people next door.

QUESTION 4:

Do you support the ballot measure to raise taxes to add 1,000 officers to the Los Angeles Police Department?

I support the measure I authored that calls for rehiring retired police officers. It would give retired officers substantial additional income, save the city millions and get the officers into the field now, not after they've graduated from the Police Academy.

QUESTION 5:

What do you think should be done about street gangs in Los Angeles?

Many young people associating with gangs can be turned around. I cannot stress enough my L.A. Manpower Project Program to offer at-risk youth a chance to contribute to community renewal and get decent wages. To remove the worst offenders from the streets, we should stop cutting back on juvenile probation camps. I'm for locking up hard-core offenders.

QUESTION 6:

Do you support any restrictions on the right of people to own firearms? If so, what restrictions do you support?

I support background checks into potential gun purchasers. I want assault weapons off the streets. Otherwise, I have a high regard for the 2nd Amendment and don't want to tamper with it.

QUESTION 7:

Do you believe the city government should try to alleviate homelessness in Los Angeles? If so, how?

The city needs money from the other governments, especially the federal. Many problems dealing with the homeless have to do with our overcrowding, and the federal government can help enormously. I would work with President Clinton in formulating financial aid.

QUESTION 8:

Do you support continued growth of rail mass transit, despite low ridership and high per-passenger cost to government?

Yes. Though current ridership is low, ridership availability must exist if we're to get people out of their single-occupant cars. It is the wave of the future, along with electric cars for both private citizens and government use.

QUESTION 9:

Do you have a plan to balance the city budget? If so, please describe it.

The only way to balance the city budget is to increase revenues while cutting spending. Los Angeles must do away with redundant programs, wasteful bureaucracy and needless trimmings. I will lead efforts to get our fair share of funds from federal, state and county sources.

QUESTION 10:

Do you support any tax increase or other source of additional revenue for the city? If so, please describe it.

The city needs its fair share from the federal, state and county governments. I am certain that President Clinton is aware that world's eyes are on L.A. The federal government, with the strong programs proposed out of my office as mayor, will work with us.

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