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Decision '93 / A LOOK AT THE ELECTION IN LOS ANGELES COUNTY : The Issues

April 11, 1993

On these pages, the 11 leading candidates give their views on the local economy, racial tension, gangs, higher taxes for more police officers. . . They also respond to questions on gun control, the city's homelessness, mass transit, the city budget and where they would look for new revenue.

* Julian Nava

* QUESTION 1:

If you are elected mayor, what will be your first important official action?

Make the first State of the City address, charting the tasks at hand for government and how the public can become involved in healing the city and starting an urban recovery.

QUESTION 2:

Do you have a plan for improving the city's economy? If so, please describe it briefly.

I would lead in the formation of a basinwide economic planning council, somewhat as the region has done with the environment, water and transportation. Promoting coordination in the social and economic areas would benefit all the smaller cities and country territory as well.

QUESTION 3:

Do you have a plan for reducing racial and ethnic tensions in Los Angeles? If so, please describe it.

Help continue good programs of city government, encourage related activities of various segments of society. Promote social justice and good economic conditions--this will help maintain progress toward more positive social conduct, as time and education change attitudes.

QUESTION 4:

Do you support the ballot measure to raise taxes to add 1,000 officers to the Los Angeles Police Department?

Yes, but 1,000 officers are far from enough. I propose a Civic Patrol Corps of some 8,000 to supplement LAPD foot patrols in needed areas, comprised of Los Angeles residents in the military. Salaries and costs would be met by the federal government.

QUESTION 5:

What do you think should be done about street gangs in Los Angeles?

Divert redeemable gang members, by far the greater number, through incentives to enter work and business, offering employment at attractive wages. Send the crime-prone and those with minor records to boot-camp-style vocational training. Prosecute or deport the hard-core members.

QUESTION 6:

Do you support any restrictions on the right of people to own firearms? If so, what restrictions do you support?

Current laws are in the main adequate. Until more personal security can be assured, I am reluctant to advance more restrictions, which do not come under city jurisdiction anyway.

QUESTION 7:

Do you believe the city government should try to alleviate homelessness in Los Angeles? If so, how?

Yes. Create housing, feeding and training for the homeless for a transitory period. They can help pay by working. Mentally ill homeless are mainly a state problem. Homeless that have such a chronic lifestyle can be discouraged from choosing L.A. to live in by jailing them as vagrants, should they not accept the city program.

QUESTION 8:

Do you support continued growth of rail mass transit, despite low ridership and high per-passenger cost to government?

Yes. Over time the investment will pay off in several ways. I prefer monorail where possible. Urban renewal should be linked to mass transit routes.

QUESTION 9:

Do you have a plan to balance the city budget? If so, please describe it.

We must assume little assistance from the state or national government. Fire, police and sanitation alone are indispensable city obligations. I support reducing city salaries to balance the budget, rather than layoffs. A Little Hoover Commission could recommend changes for elimination of duplicating departments and agencies, and other reforms.

QUESTION 10:

Do you support any tax increase or other source of additional revenue for the city? If so, please describe it.

A payroll tax on salaries and wages earned in Los Angeles. This would not be a general income tax. As thousands of commuters from nearby cities helped support the infrastructure of Los Angeles, taxes and fees paid only by residents could decrease.

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