Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

Prime-Time Flicks

April 18, 1993|Kevin Thomas

The callow 1991 Mobsters (NBC Sunday at 9 p.m.) looks like it was made by people who have seen too many gangster movies for people who haven't seen any. Purporting to tell us of the youthful years of Lucky Luciano (Christian Slater), Meyer Lansky (Patrick Dempsey), Bugsy Siegel (Richard Grieco) and Frank Costello (Costas Mandylor) it lacks any sense of how ambition, rage, poverty, wealth and psychopathology can contort youthfulness.

When secretaries Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin and Dolly Parton declare war in 9 to 5 (KTLA Monday at 8 p.m.) on their boss Dabney Coleman, they deliver the goods in high comic style, scoring points for women's rights in the workplace. However, the 1980 film strays so far from reality, it loses sight of the satirical points it wants to make.

Steven Spielberg's interminable 1989 Always (ABC Monday at 8:30 p.m.) is an ill-advised remake of the 1943 "A Guy Named Joe"; Richard Dreyfuss is a flying ace who's killed but allowed by an angel (Audrey Hepburn, in her last film) to come back to help a new pilot (Brad Johnson) become the hotshot he had been.

Sweet Hearts Dance (KTLA Wednesday at 8 p.m.) is an alternately fetching and annoying 1988 release about tensions in a Vermont town among people who have known each other a lifetime, centering on two buddies (Don Johnson, Jeff Daniels) whose destinies crisscross.

The 1984 Purple Hearts (KCOP Friday at 8 p.m.) seems a deliberate (but pale) carbon of "An Officer and a Gentleman," an old-fashioned, all-stops-out romance between a Marine Corps doctor (Ken Wahl) and a Navy nurse (Cheryl Ladd), played out against the Vietnam War.

The Graduate (KCOP Saturday at 6 p.m.), the 1967 generation gap classic, stars Dustin Hoffman and Anne Bancroft as the notorious Mrs. Robinson, who tries to seduce him.

Strapless (KTLA Saturday at 8 p.m.), David Hare's intelligent, engrossing--and largely overlooked--1989 film, stars Blair Brown as an American doctor, long working in London, who finds her ordered life unexpectedly shaken. Intensifying matters is the arrival of her hoydenish younger sister (Bridget Fonda); terrific performances by Brown, Fonda and also Bruno Ganz.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|