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Prime-Time Flicks

May 16, 1993|Kevin Thomas

Anyone who has ever tried to fix up any kind of residence most likely will respond to the laughter of recognition that the 1986 The Money Pit (KTLA Sunday at 6 p.m.) elicits, yet this overly exaggerated comedy isn't as inspired or as funny as it should be. With Tom Hanks and Shelley Long.

On the late show, the 1983 High Road to China (KABC Monday at midnight) features Tom Selleck, perfectly cast as a World War I flying ace caught up in an adventure-filled 1920 race against the clock from Istanbul to Afghanistan. Bess Armstrong is equally well-cast as Selleck's resourceful leading lady.

The Karate Kid (KTTV Monday at 8 p.m.) is one of those movies in which everything works right from the start. Slight, dark-eyed Ralph Macchio, newly arrived from Newark to Reseda, learns how to handle the bullies when he's tutored by the kindly yet strict Noriyuki (Pat Morita, who won an Oscar nomination for his performance in 1986).

A shamelessly commercial enterprise gone sour, the 1991 King Ralph (NBC Tuesday at 8 p.m.) stars John Goodman, who's too calculating to be funny, as a Las Vegas cocktail lounge pianist who winds up on the British throne. Also wasted: Peter O'Toole and John Hurt.

The Color Purple (CBS Thursday at 8 p.m.), Stephen Spielberg's 1985 film of Alice Walker's novel of poor, rural African-American life, is engrossing but finally too overblown, yet it did show to advantage Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover and especially Oprah Winfrey.

John Hughes' 1985 The Breakfast Club (KTLA Saturday at 6 p.m.) takes place in a suburban Illinois high school where five very different students (Anthony Michael Hall, Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald and Judd Nelson), condemned to all-day detention, come to know each other.

The Color of Money (KTLA Saturday 8 p.m.), Martin Scorsese's 1986 sequel to "The Hustler," teams seasoned Paul Newman with brash contender Tom Cruise for a pool table championship. A terrific in-the-American-grain movie--until its inexplicably miscalculated finish.

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