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MORNING REPORT

September 13, 1993|BETH KLEID | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press

PEOPLE WATCH

Deep, Deep Pockets: Talk-show host Oprah Winfrey, with an estimated $98 million in earnings over two years, is the first woman to top Forbes' magazine annual list of the richest entertainers. Winfrey pushed out Bill Cosby, who was in first place last year but stumbled to third with two-year earnings of $66 million. Producer Steven Spielberg clinched the No. 2 spot by pulling in $72 million in the last two years, thanks in large part to "Jurassic Park" box-office sales that could reach $600 million in 1993. With a videocassette release upcoming, Forbes says, Spielberg could top the list next year. Rockers rocked this year's list: Guns N' Roses came in No. 4 from last year's No. 10 with $53 million, pop singer Prince rose to No. 5 from No. 12 with $49 million and rock group U2 rose to No. 8 from No. 16 with $47 million. Michael Jackson and Madonna both fell from their former Top 10 status to No. 12 and No. 15, respectively. Eric Clapton joined the roster at No. 16 with $33 million. The list, based on total gross earnings for 1992 and 1993, appears in the magazine's Sept. 27 issue.

MOVIES

Bravo for 'Short Cuts': American director Robert Altman's "Short Cuts" shared the Golden Lion for best film with "Trois Couleurs. Bleu" by Poland's Krzysztof Kieslowski as the 50th Venice Film Festival ended on Saturday. "Short Cuts' " large cast, headed by Matthew Modine, Tim Robbins and Jack Lemmon, received a special collective award. Fabrizio Ventivoglio won best actor for "Un Anima Divisa in Due" ("A Soul Divided in Two") and Juliette Binoche was named best actress for her role in Kieslowski's movie. Best supporting awards went to Marcello Mastroianni in Bertrand Blier's "Un, Deux, Trois, Soleil" ("One, Two, Three, Sun") and Anna Bonaiuto in "Dove Siete? Io Sono Qui" ("Where Are You, I'm Here") by Liliana Cavani. Eighteen films from 12 countries competed.

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Still Running: The Harrison Ford thriller "The Fugitive" from Warner Bros. was ahead of its pursuers for the sixth straight weekend at the nation's box office, grossing $8.7 million, according to early industry estimates. "Undercover Blues," MGM's new Kathleen Turner-Dennis Quaid spy comedy, finished second with $4.2 million. "True Romance," Warner Bros.' new release starring Christian Slater and Patricia Arquette, was third with $4 million. Another Warner Bros.' film, "The Man Without a Face," was fourth with $3 million. The Kim Basinger-Val Kilmer bank heist film "The Real McCoy," from Universal, came in fifth with $2.7 million for its opening weekend.

TELEVISION/RADIO

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No 'Blue' in Dallas: The local ABC affiliate in Dallas, WFAA-TV, has decided not to carry "NYPD Blue," Steven Bochco's controversial new police series. Several stations across the country have dropped the series in advance of its Sept. 21 premiere, but WFAA is believed to be the first ABC affiliate in a Top 20 market to veto it (Dallas-Fort Worth is the nation's eighth largest TV market). WFAA was recently picketed by members of the American Family Assn., which calls the series "soft-core porn." Cathy Creany, vice president-general manager of WFAA, said the program doesn't meet the station's standards. A. H. Belo Corp., which owns WFAA, will also preempt "NYPD Blue" on its ABC affiliate station in Norfolk, Va., Creany said.

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More on Baby Jessica: The new syndicated newsmagazine "American Journal" begins its second week on the air tonight with a scoop: anchor Nancy Glass' exclusive interview with Dan and Cara Schmidt, the natural parents of Baby Jessica, who was at the center of this summer's much-publicized custody battle. The interview is the first the couple has given since they took custody of Jessica on Aug. 2 after a bitter court battle with her adoptive parents, Jan and Roberta DeBoer. Glass' piece will show home videos of Jessica's transfer to the Schmidts' house. The report will continue on Tuesday's edition of the show, which airs in Los Angeles on KCAL Channel 9 at 7:30 p.m.

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Can You Tell Her How to Get to . . . ?: First lady Hillary Rodham Clinton flies to New York today to tape her debut on PBS' "Sesame Street." Aides said the first lady is likely to demonstrate the benefits of knowing the alphabet, or perhaps read a favorite storybook. The episode, scheduled to air in November, will open the award-winning series' 25th year.

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Hitting the Bull's-eye: Call KCBS-FM (93.1) by its new name, "Arrow '93," because now it's featuring "All Rock and Roll Oldies." Though the acronym isn't perfect, the station began announcing itself on air Friday with the new moniker to accommodate an adjustment in format. Instead of focusing exclusively on oldies, the station is concentrating on the more popular rock songs of the 1960s and '70s. The station is keeping its call letters.

QUICK TAKES

Mark Frost, who co-created "Twin Peaks," is plugging his first novel, a mystery thriller (what else?) called "The List of 7" this week. He'll do a reading Tuesday night at Book Soup in Hollywood at 7 p.m., and another at Book'em Mysteries in South Pasadena at 7 p.m. on Friday. . . . The Laugh Factory in West Hollywood is opening its doors to those in the entertainment community who need a place to observe the Jewish High Holiday, Rosh Hashana. Free services will be held Thursday at noon at the comedy club; reservations are advised.

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