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The Natural

January 02, 1994

Kudos for publishing "On Willow Creek" (Nov. 28). Rick Bass' writing is in keeping with the best of the American nature writers, starting with Emerson and continuing with Edward Abbey.

This type of essay speaks for nature and against cement-paved malls and freeways, and will do more for the conservation of water and earth than a lot of technical data. It goes straight to the heart.

KARIN FINELL

Santa Barbara

*

I was deeply touched by "On Willow Creek." I was born in Dallas, Tex., and raised in Garland. I am a fifth-generation Texan, and at one time there was even a town called Pyle's Prairie, after our family. "On Willow Creek" could be my story.

However, I have now lived in Los Angeles for almost 14 years. I hate this place and the way it steals people's souls. I think that, all things considered, I have fared well all these years and remain pretty much intact. I am convinced that a large part of the reason for that is the Texas mind-set I was given.

I have been greatly misunderstood by many people who have mistaken my "Texas pride" for some sort of arrogance or bigotry, when the reality is I have not fully understood this attitude myself. You explained a large part of who I am in a way that I have never been able to voice. I am very grateful for that.

KEVIN PYLE

Valley Village

*

"On Willow Creek" is no "Walden Pond," and a Thoreau he may never be, but writer Rick Bass is good. He makes you feel like dropping everything materialistic and heading for the hills. Or at least the nearest park.

KEN HULBERT

Santa Barbara

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