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Tying The Knot, For Real

January 16, 1994|NANCY M. REICHARDT

The bells of last Christmas combined with wedding bells when "General Hospital" favorites Kristina Malandro (Felicia Jones) and Jack Wagner (who played Felicia's husband, Frisco, on "General Hospital") tied the marital knot in real life.

After deciding to take the big step, Malandro and Wagner flew in a chartered Lear jet to snow-covered Lake Tahoe, where they were married in a private ceremony. The duo then flew to Las Vegas, where they spent a romantic overnight honeymoon before returning to Los Angeles the next Sunday. Malandro had to report to the "General Hospital" set for work the next day.

Petey, Malandro and Wagner's toddler, spent the weekend with his nanny while his parents exchanged vows.

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Film, television and theater actress Rosalind Cash is creating the contract role of Mary Mae Ward on "General Hospital" this month. Mary Mae is the former owner of an old house that was purchased by Laura and Luke Spencer (Genie Francis and Tony Geary). It seems that Mary Mae's vivid recollections of Port Charles at an earlier time will interest and surprise many of the town's residents.

On the big screen, Cash had roles in the films "Buckaroo Banzai," "Amazing Grace," "The Omega Man" and "Uptown Saturday Night." Her TV credits include roles on "China Beach," "thirtysomething," "Cagney & Lacey" and "Hill Street Blues." Her theater credits are numerous, including work with the New York Shakespeare Festival, the La Jolla Playhouse and the Paoli Theatre in Rome.

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You might not have guessed this, but Deborah Adair (Kate Roberts on "Days of Our Lives") is a gourmet cook. Apparently the beautiful actress learned all her culinary tricks from her family.

"As a child growing up, I was surrounded by fabulous cooks," says Adair. "I used to sit in my grandmother's kitchen, my mother's kitchen and my uncle's kitchen. I didn't know there was such a thing as bad cooking, until I left home. I thought everybody cooked well.

"My mother was a schoolteacher who worked horrendous hours," she continues. "Plus she had a horrendous commute. Yet she always managed to prepare a first, second and third course at every dinner. We'd usually start off with a lovely salad, followed by an entree and a dessert, which was usually fruit. My mother was very health-oriented. So we ate a lot of fish and low-fat meals."

Meanwhile, her uncle taught Adair all about cosmopolitan cooking. "He used to send me recipes via the mail for different hors d'oeuvres and all kinds of fancy-shmansy stuff."

"And my grandmother, who was just my favorite person in the world, was a Southern cook, a farm cook," adds Adair. "She'd make spoon bread, corn pudding, fried chicken."

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