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This Big 'Cap Leads to Big Flap for All

March 12, 1994

Alan Paulson is a very wealthy man and a true sportsman. His returns can never approach his vast investment in horse racing. His rewards are prestige and recognition as a major force in the sport he loves.

However, his horse, Stuka, did not deserve to be given the winner's purse in the Santa Anita Handicap, since he finished second and was not involved in the incident that caused the disqualification of the winner. It would seem appropriate that Mr. Paulson donated the more than $300,000 difference between first and second money to a worthy charity, such as a home for indigent horse players, or research on the cause of, and cure for, brain damage in racing stewards.

CLARENCE BERMAN

Redondo Beach

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I am writing to discuss the article about the disqualification of The Wicked North from the Santa Anita Handicap. I was with the Paulson party last Saturday. I take great issue with Bill Christine's article about the remarks of Mr. Phil Hersh.

Mr. and Mrs. Paulson and their party did not leave their box until the inquiry was over and Stuka was declared the winner. The Hersh party was already leaving the winner's circle and going down the ramp when we arrived. At no time did Mr. Paulson ask anyone to leave the winner's circle. The remark he made was that he was sorry their number was taken down and that it had happened to him in the past.

NICHOLAS V. DIACO

Santa Monica

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