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HOT PROPS

Simple Minded

May 19, 1994|ROSE APODACA JONES

There's Dweeb, Barney, Shorty, oh, and Bam Bam. They exist for those who "don't want to feel like a dork," says footwear designer Eric Meyer. "They" are the sneakers, clogs and casual shoes (above) that are selling like mad under Meyer's line Simple (about $54). "The idea was to reduce down to the basics rather than add all the gizmos for a marketing appeal," says the former shoe man for Vision Sports. "I took a step backward by taking classic old styles and remaking them with the latest technology."

It Runneth Over

The battle of the bras continues as Maidenform lets it be known that it won't be flattened by British newcomer Wonderbra. After all, the New York-based company claims about 70% of the push-up bra market in the U.S., and its foundations cost almost half as much as the foreign brand. The Wonderbra hoopla, concedes Maidenform spokeswoman Clare McLean, "has been wonderful for the industry overall. We just want customers to be aware of the range of options." From this Monday through mid-June, the company will offer a special promotion in department stores nationwide asking gals to "take the plunge."

Fuzzy on the Origin

Couture king Karl Lagerfeld may have wowed fashion fans with his faux fur clothes (and we're not talking coats) for fall. The clothes surprised local club-wear designer Mya Abbott--but only because she's long been cutting corset-style vests from hairy synthetic skins ($38) for her label Paper Doll Productions. Her clients wrap up in leopard, burgundy, green, silver and black (below). "Fur is not as prevalent as velvet, but it still has a luxurious feel to it," says Abbott. Demand is so hot, she's added belts ($16) and shoulder bags ($18) to the line.

Short Cuts

The thigh's not just the limit as skirts rise dangerously high this year. The flirtiest of models is the A-line silhouette. In rayon or suede, the freshest are those that bell out slightly like something out of the Jetsons. The A-line takes some of the edge off straight versions which can, intentionally or not, look risque.

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