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Last Action Zeros

May 29, 1994

Regarding "These Guys Blow Us Away," by David Kronke (Summer Sneaks, May 15):

Your article on action movies is guilty of a crime you and Hollywood have perpetuated in the past. The premise is that people are tired of action films. The proof you cite is the box-office failure of several movies: "Last Action Hero," "On Deadly Ground," "The Getaway," "The Chase" and "No Escape."

This is typical denial. These films didn't bomb because people are tired of action films. (Although it's quite possible that we may be.) These films bombed because they were terrible. It's that simple.

If Hollywood would stop obsessing on finding just the right formula and start obsessing on making good films, regardless of their genre, we'd all be a lot happier, and they'd be making money hand over fist.

JOSH OLSON

Hermosa Beach

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How on Earth can anyone write a five-page article on action movies and not once mention producer Joel Silver? My God, he practically single-handedly invented the mega-budget action film as we know it today.

My friends and I would like to know what restaurant critic concocted the insane list of the 10 best directors of action films. I mean, you put Quentin Tarantino on the list with one directing credit? And you call John Woo, the greatest and most influential action-film director in the Orient (with 23 films to his credit), an "up-and-comer"? Jeez.

There's no excuse for this. It isn't funny--it's plain sloppy writing and research unworthy of any major newspaper.

LAWRENCE S. BROOKS

Los Angeles

Producer Silver, through his office, declined repeated requests to be interviewed for the story.

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Kronke's list of action movie directors was fascinating, but may I suggest that Tony Scott is more action-oriented that his brother Ridley.

Tony's credits include "Top Gun" (1986), "Beverly Hills Cop II" (1987), "Revenge" (1990), "Days of Thunder" (1990) and the recent "True Romance." One of his trademarks is his use of riveting car chases, as was particularly evident in "The Last Boy Scout" (1991).

ALAN WARNER

Los Angeles

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