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ORANGE COUNTY NEWSWATCH

July 31, 1994|Jerry Hicks and Mike Boehm and Mark Platte

PRIME WATCHER: Two dozen local women told ABC-TV's "Prime Time Live" as a group last year that former Tustin gynecologist Ivan C. Namihas had sexually molested them. Namihas denies it, and the show aired after local prosecutors said it was too late to charge him. The women's efforts paid off. . . . An executive in the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles watched the show with interest. Result: A year later, federal prosecutors have charged Namihas with mail fraud related to false billing.

NEW FIRE FACE? If you live in Westminster, you've likely seen the dramatic cover on the city's brochure for signing up for its paramedic subscription program. It shows a firefighter, face blackened with soot, carrying a child clutching her teddy bear out of a burning house. But you won't see it anymore. . . . That firefighter, Paul Gilbrook, was fired recently. He argues it was for his activities as president of the Westminster Firefighters Union. The council says it was for other reasons. New brochures will be sent out to residents soon.

BY DESIGN: KLOS-FM radio (95.5) is giving you an extra reason for participating in its annual, weeklong blood drive, which starts Monday in Santa Ana: You get a free T-shirt. . . . The shirt's life-saving message was designed by Teresa Acosta, 9, of West Covina, a leukemia victim who's received nearly 100 blood units in her treatment. The local American Red Cross chapter's Judy Iannaccone, above, says you can donate at its office at 600 Parker Center Drive in Santa Ana.

SNOOPING AROUND: If you were worried about Arsenio Hall being out of work since his talk show closed, he's still in demand. Hall will be among the guests at a Celebrity Basketball and Comedy Jam at the Bren Events Center at UC Irvine Tuesday night. . . . Comics such as Hall and Robert Townshend will perform before the game. Other names playing: Teri Hatcher, who is Superman's Lois Lane on ABC-TV, and rap music's Snoop Doggy Dog. Game proceeds go to young people with brain disorders.

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