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Drug Control Policy

August 05, 1994

I, too, applaud the RAND Corp.'s study on controlling cocaine. I agree with your article (June 14) and editorial, "How to Be Effective Against Cocaine" (June 16), as well as the RAND study, which support more funds for treatment. However, Congress does not seem to agree. Out of the $355 million President Clinton has requested to expand drug treatment opportunities, Congress has only approved $61 million.

The 1994 national drug control strategy makes treatment of chronic, hard-core drug users one of its top priorities. The President's fiscal-year 1995 drug control budget request reflects this by requesting a record $355 million for treatment of hard-core users.

At the same time, this Administration realizes the importance of a balanced approach to the drug crisis in our country. Treatment alone cannot solve the drug problem. Supply control also plays an important role. We will continue to have effective supply-reduction programs, such as interdiction and source country programs. This is not an "either-or" debate. An effective national drug control strategy cannot be accomplished by funding some effective programs at the expense of others. The balanced approach we seek does not mean abandoning supply-reduction activities. It means giving appropriate weight to each of the demand-and-supply elements that, in concert, contribute to the comprehensive approach required.

The success of the 1994 national drug control strategy cannot be realized without proper funding and a commitment from Congress to reduce drug use and its availability in our country.

LEE P. BROWN, Director

Office of National Drug Control Policy

Washington

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