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Wulf Cries and 'Guilty Pigs' Squeal

August 28, 1994

The letters in response to the well-written "Speaking Out" article by Carrie Wulf on "The Evolution of Getting Escrewed" show an interesting trend, to say the least. The majority of the responding letters are written by realtors, escrow personnel, appraisers and other individuals affiliated with making a living on the sale of a home. Almost all wrote about how infuriated they felt. Have they forgotten what the buyer feels?

Thank you, Mrs. Wulf, for your letter. It was a letter written to describe your experience with the real estate "world." As a new homeowner myself, I relate to feeling "escrewed." The article was of great value because it has challenged those who have forgotten what it is like to be on the other side of the fence. To all who were angered by the article, wake up and remember who you are serving! Let's not forget that the buyer is the customer who provides your income.

DAN GARCIA, Los Angeles

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After reading all the moaning, groaning and self-righteous cries from the real estate community (Letters, Aug. 21) about the "Speaking Out" article by Carrie Wulf, what immediately comes to mind is a quote from my father years ago: "The guilty pig always squeals."

RON CARTER, Laguna Beach

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I'm responding in defense of Carrie Wulf. I listed my home for sale this year and have been truly "educated" in many ways in the wonderful world of real estate. So I can sympathize with the Wulfs.

My estimated statement of sales cost (excluding the 6% commission) is 30 1/4 times more that original escrow costs in 1968!

Assuming one's income to be $10,000 a year in 1968, it's very unlikely an employer now pays that same employee $302,500 per year. No matter how much paper work and complexities of the job have increased.

I suggest that today's man-made complexities were deliberately introduced to confuse the layman and justify "garbage fees," the real purpose being to use this as a conduit to produce more money. How many sheets of paper were used to process a sale in the 1960s compared to today? And are they all really, really necessary?

JOHN LLEWELLYN, Huntington Beach

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