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Prime-Time Flicks

October 23, 1994|Kevin Thomas

In a fragile and unpredictable world, the 1990 blockbuster Ghost (CBS Sunday at 9 p.m.) struck a seductive chord: A lover (Patrick Swayze) from the afterlife hovers over his bloved (Demi Moore) to keep her from harm, trying to communicate the love he couldn't express for her in life.

With the 1987 cmedy Baby Boom (KTLA Monday at 8 p.m.), director Charles Shyer and writer-producer Nancy Meyers have lots of fun sticking an adorable infant wit an avowedly single workaholic (Diane Keaton, in a dream part). Shyer and Meyers aren't afraid to be sophisticated and screwball, and they know just how far to exaggerate for laughs without leaving touch with reality entirely.

Watching The Witches of Eastwick (KCOP Monday at 8 p.m.) is enough to make you believe that Jack Nicholson was born to play the devil, conjured up by Rhode Islander singles Cher, Susan Sarandon and Michelle Pfeiffer. The curse of this 1987 movie is that playwright Michael Cristofer's botched and bandaged script turns John Updike's novel inside out and upside down.

A lot has been made of the fact that with 1990's Blue Steel (KTLA Tuesday at 8 p.m.), director Kathryn Bigelow invaded the men's club of the bloody action-thriller. Ron Silver is the upscale psycho who gets slack-jawed when he sees a woman cop (Jamie Lee Curtis, in a strong portrayal) who can kill with the cool he'd like to have.

In Midnight Run (KTLA Wednesday at 8 p.m.) Robert De Niro, as a hard-case bounty hunter, and Charles Grodin, as a soft-shelled embezzler, are the stars of this often murderously funny 1988 chase comedy, a kind of crime movie Odd Couple, a Laurel and Hardy on the run.

Double, Double, Toil and Trouble (ABC Saturday at 8 p.m.) is a 1993 TV movie, a caldron of warm fuzzy fare about witches, spells and moonstones, strictly for little Halloweensters and fans of "Full House" twin phenoms Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen, who try to save their parents from financial ruin; it features Cloris Leachman in a dual role.

For older audiences, there's the 1974 horror-classic The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (KCAL Saturday at 9 p.m.). And for the truly grown-up: KCET's Saturday-night double feature, the 1933 Blonde Bombshell (KCET Saturday at 9 p.m.), with Jean Harlow in a wicked satire on Hollywood, and the 1931 Blonde Crazy (KCET Saturda at 10:35 p.m.), with James Cagney as a small-time crook taking on big-leaguer Louis Calhern.

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