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THE REGION : Streets Stay Calm After Prop. 187 Win

November 10, 1994|SUSAN STEINBERG | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

Law enforcement agencies reported that the Los Angeles area was quiet after Tuesday's election, despite earlier concerns that passage of the controversial Proposition 187 could trigger civil unrest.

Los Angeles Police Department officials reported no election-related incidents on the Westside as of Wednesday morning, although the department called in some officers who were scheduled to be off and planned to remain on maximum deployment throughout the day Wednesday, said Officer Lorie Taylor, a department spokeswoman.

As of Wednesday morning, opponents of Proposition 187 had held only one protest in the area. Between 75 and 100 students conducted a peaceful walkout at Hamilton High School in West Los Angeles, Taylor said. However, the LAPD reported two bomb threats possibly related to the election Wednesday, one at Parker Center and another at the federal building in Van Nuys. Both turned out to be false.

Proposition 187, which seeks to deny public education and health services to illegal immigrants, was overwhelmingly passed by voters Tuesday. The controversial ballot initiative had prompted thousands of protest rallies in Southern California, primarily in high schools, before the election.

The LAPD had been on tactical alert Monday because of the number of demonstrations in opposition to Proposition 187. The tactical alert was downgraded to the maximum-deployment designation on Tuesday, Taylor said.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department reported no election-related incidents occurring immediately before or after the election. A sheriff's spokeswoman said there had been no indication that anything out of the ordinary would take place, and the department was not on alert.

Santa Monica police said the city was calm Tuesday, and the department continued with normal levels of staffing on Wednesday.

"We haven't had any indications or heard any rumors that demonstrations are planned," said police Lt. Bill Brucker. There had been two peaceful protest marches in Santa Monica preceding the election.

Culver City police said they remained on modified tactical alert, with extra officers in the field. Beverly Hills police reported no election-related incidents and officers were not on alert.

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