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Proposed Preservation Areas

November 13, 1994|R. DANIEL FOSTER

The following communities are seeking approval for HPOZs within the city of Los Angeles. Boundaries are approximate; the precise perimeters may include additional streets.

--Beverly-Fairfax, south of West Hollywood.

Boundary: Rosewood Avenue to the north, Wilshire Boulevard to the south (not inclusive of the boulevard), Highland Avenue to the east and San Vicente Boulevard to the west. Several pockets throughout the area would not be included.

Architecture: Revival styles, mostly Spanish Colonial.

Total structures: 5,000, with about 90% contributing to historic status.

Status: Proposed by Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky's office three years ago, the zone has held no hearings to date. A survey was recently started.

--Raymond-Kenwood, southwest of Downtown.

Boundary: Adams Boulevard to the north, 29th Street to the south, Raymond Avenue to the east and the east side of Normandie Avenue to the west.

Architecture: Craftsman bungalow.

Total structures: About 75, with about 90% contributing to historic status.

Status: Some public meetings have been held and organizers are in the process of educating homeowners. The process began about three years ago. No survey has been conducted.

--Adams-Normandie, southwest of Downtown.

Boundary: Santa Monica 10 Freeway to the north, Jefferson Boulevard to the South, Vermont Avenue to the east and Normandie Avenue to the west.

Architecture: Late Victorian and Craftsman bungalow.

Total structures: About 500, with the majority contributing to historic status.

Status: The Adams-Normandie block club has been meeting with the adjoining Van Buren Place and Budlong block clubs for the past year to form one or several HPOZs. Two meetings have been held and a larger public meeting is slated for fall.

--Van Buren Place, southwest of Downtown.

Boundary: Most of the 2600 block of Van Buren Place.

Architecture: Craftsman bungalow and Victorian transitional. Total structures: 14, 12 of which are contributing to historic status.

Status: Homeowners have collected considerable information because the block is on the National Register of Historic Homes. (An HPOZ would give more protection locally.) The process, which began four years ago, is on hold pending a homeowner's meeting with their councilman.

--Devon-Ashton, east of Westwood.

Boundary: Not definite to date, but generally, a six- to 10-block area surrounding the intersection of Devon and Ashton avenues.

Architecture: Regency-style garden court apartments.

Total structures: Unknown.

Status: After a survey was completed in 1988 as part of a Westwood plan, no hearings were held, but proponents are now looking to update the survey.

--Windward Circle, Venice.

Boundary: Not definite to date, but generally, a four to five block area around the intersection of Windward and Pacific avenues.

Architecture: Venetian colonnades, fantasy, Renaissance revival and Renaissance Gothic.

Total structures: About 20 commercial buildings, all of which contribute to historic status.

Status: The area was first considered for an HPOZ in 1988. The site will most likely be examined as part of a larger Venice coastal plan, required by the state for all coastal communities. That plan is due in early 1995.

--Sorority Row, east Westwood Village.

Boundary: Hilgard Avenue, between Sunset and Wilshire boulevards.

Architecture: Mediterranean revival.

Total structures: 75, with 60% contributing to historic status.

Status: The city's planning commission turned down an HPOZ proposal in April, 1991, because the area is largely composed of transient renters. Activists, who began their fight in 1986, feel the proposal can be resurrected.

--Miracle Mile South, west of Hancock Park.

Boundary: 3rd Street to the north, Wilshire Boulevard to the south, Detroit Street to the east and Hauser Boulevard to the west.

Architecture: Depression-era Mediterranean style apartment buildings.

Total structures: 236, with 197 contributing to historic status.

Status: Eight years after community meetings began in 1986, the zone proposal was recently defeated by the Los Angeles City Council because the area's survey, completed in 1988, was outdated. Owners and renters in the area are considering whether to update the survey.

--Carthay Circle, east of Beverly Hills.

Boundary: Wilshire Boulevard to the north, Olympic Boulevard to the south, Fairfax to the east and La Cienega to the west.

Architecture: Mostly Spanish colonial.

Total structures: 400, all of which contribute to historic status.

Status: Several homeowner meetings have been held since the zone was first considered in 1989. A survey, now partially completed, will be given to the Cultural Heritage Commission. Copies of the area's history will be given to residents in the near future.

--Lafayette Square, mid-city.

Boundary: Venice Boulevard to the north, Washington Boulevard to the south, Crenshaw Boulevard to the east and West Boulevard to the west.

Architecture: Craftsman bungalow, Victorian, Tudor, Mediterranean, Norman.

Total structures: 236, with a majority contributing to historic status.

Status: Meetings with area homeowners associations and the Los Angeles Conservancy began in January. Residents are now planning to complete a survey and conduct a petition drive.

--Atwater Village.

Boundary: Glendale city line to the north, Fletcher Drive to the south, Glendale city line to the east and the Los Angeles River to the west.

Architecture: Fantasy bungalows and colonial and Spanish revival.

Total structures: 5,800, with more than half contributing to historic status.

Status: After an initial push for an HPOZ two years ago, the issue faded. Some research has been conducted and some photos have been taken of buildings.

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