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More Low-Income Housing for Disabled

November 13, 1994

The story about community efforts to help the disabled buy homes ("On Their Own," Oct. 30) did a good job of illustrating how important feelings of independence and security are to those with disabilities. They are, in fact, the same reasons most people hope to one day own a home.

The Crippled Children's Society of Southern California had developed a number of apartment communities throughout the area, representing more than 100 units of housing for low-income adults with physical and or developmental disabilities. Just this week, we broke ground on Ivy Glen Apartments, a 25-unit complex in Glendale that is being financed with grants from HUD and the Glendale Housing Authority. We will soon be announcing plans for a similar housing complex and regional service center in East Los Angeles.

These projects, and others like them, represent only a small fraction of the amount of low-income housing needed by our disabled population, but they are a start. Most important, they provide residents with a decent home and a chance to live a normal life as productive members of the community. We are proud to be doing our part on this effort.

MARILYN GRAVES

President

Crippled Children's Society

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