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MORNING BRIEFING

And If They Skate in Venice They Will Never Stand Out

November 16, 1994|SHAV GLICK

Outfielder David Justice of the Atlanta Braves and his wife, actress Halle Berry, have bought a house in the Hollywood Hills, where their neighbors include comedian Jerry Seinfeld and actress Sharon Stone.

"Believe it or not, you feel like more of a normal person out there," Justice told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. "I can go anywhere I want, do anything I want. (The people) are so used to seeing so many so-called celebrities that they are just used to it. It is nothing to them."

Justice said he and his wife go in-line skating at the beach almost every day.

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Trivia time: Four teams from Pennsylvania have played in the Rose Bowl game. What schools did they represent?

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Down the hatch: An amusement-park thrill ride will be the site of a national sports championship next year.

Grizzly River Rampage, a man-made waterway in the Opryland USA theme park near Nashville, Tenn., will hold the national whitewater slalom and canoe championships on Sept. 15.

What's next, slalom racing down the Disneyland Matterhorn?

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Tell it to Mr. Davis: Coach Marty Schottenheimer of the Kansas City Chiefs was asked to compare Marcus Allen to rookie Greg Hill.

"Marcus is like a fine wine," Schottenheimer said. "He keeps getting better each week."

And Hill?

"He hasn't even begun to age. He's still a carbonated beverage."

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Where are they now? Bo Kimble and Rumeal Robinson, two promising NBA players a few years ago, are playing with the Rapid City Thrillers in the Continental Basketball Assn.

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One man's view: A recent letter to the sports editor of the Portland Oregonian: "I read that . . . the Seattle Seahawks game (on Nov. 6) was going to be blacked out in the Seattle area because 10,000 tickets were not sold. Is there anything we in Portland can do to get Seahawks games blacked out here?"

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Olden days: Hall of Fame catcher Rick Ferrell, 88, remembers when major leaguers wore heavy flannels and wouldn't have considered adorning themselves with earrings or gold chains.

"You'd be joked out of the league," he said of today's players.

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Wrong sport: Nikki Ziegelmeyer, a two-time Olympic medalist in short-track speedskating, is taking a year off so she can earn enough to pay the $18,000 legal bill she ran up while fighting her suspension for code of conduct violations, which she won on appeal.

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Beware, bowlers: Professional bowler Dennis Beacham of New Zealand lists his profession as "guillotinist."

It's not what you think. Beacham owns a printing business in Auckland, where he was once a bookbinder.

"You put your book in, press a button, and the knife comes down on the paper," he said of his guillotine role.

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Trivia answer: Pennsylvania, 1917; Penn State, 1923; Pittsburgh, 1928, 1930, 1933 and 1937, and--here's the tricky one--Washington & Jefferson, 1922.

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FYI: Stan Musial of the St. Louis Cardinals had 3,630 hits in his major league career--1,815 at home and 1,815 on the road.

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Quotebook: Former Chicago Bull center Bill Cartwright, on teammate Scottie Pippen's refusal to play the final seconds of a playoff game last season: "I would have imagined more of a chance of my wife having an affair than Scottie Pippen not playing in a basketball game with 1.8 seconds on the clock."

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