Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

GOINGS ON : Holly Near Is Singing for a New Generation : She'll be in concert to help the Fund for Santa Barbara. Her music has evolved along with her changing listeners.

November 17, 1994|LEO SMITH | SPECIAL TO THE TIMES

After more than two decades on the music scene, singer-activist Holly Near sees herself as a grandmother of sorts.

"A lot of people come up to me and say they've been coming to my concerts for 22 years, which is how long I've been doing them," she said. "But I've also got 22-year-olds coming up holding their babies, who say, 'My parents raised me on your music and now I'm raising my children on your music.' "

Near will likely attract that range of audience to her fund-raising concert Sunday at Santa Barbara's Victoria Hall. The proceeds will benefit the Fund for Santa Barbara, which assists social, economic and environmental groups, organizations close to Near's heart.

"The people who come to my concerts are committed to the community on one level or another, to some kind of humanitarianism," she said. "In general, there is a belief in peace and harmony and respect and children--all those kinds of good things."

Those good things have always been concerns for Near's audiences, but there has been some evolution, she said, since the early 1970s.

"I think there's a maturity that's happened. You can go back to the '70s and find people who were in the peace movement but opposed to feminism, or people who worked for animal rights who didn't know anything about children," she said. "People now may have a broader spectrum. I think there's an overall greater understanding, tolerance and compassion, even though we are living in a time when there's more violence and intolerance than ever."

As the audience has evolved, so has Near's music.

"It seems to be getting more and more diverse, everything from what people would describe as commentary folk music, to jazz interpretations of love songs, to musical theater, to show tunes, to standards of the '30s and '40s," she said. "It sounds like a hodgepodge, but it becomes kind of a quilt."

Near's concert will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 and $100 (which includes a preconcert party and preferred seating). Tickets are available locally at the Ventura Bookstore or by calling the Arlington Theater box office at 963-4408. Victoria Hall is at 33 W. Victoria St.

*

The Santa Barbara Civic Light Opera will present the Andrew Lloyd Webber-Tim Rice collaboration "Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat" on Friday through Dec. 11 at the Granada Theatre. The musical, which tells the Old Testament story of Jacob's son Joseph and his coat of many colors, stars theater and television veteran Brian L. Green.

Show times are 8 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays, 7 p.m. Sundays, and 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. An additional 3 p.m. show is set Wednesday. Tickets range from $24.50 to $32.50 (general), and $12.25 to $13.75 (for children on Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings). Reservations: (800) 366-6064. The theater is at 1216 State St.

*

Everyone's used to pairing food with wines, but food with bands is another story. That's what folks at the fourth annual Solvang Dixieland Jazz Festival will be doing Friday through Sunday at the Solvang Royal Scandinavian Inn.

At 6 p.m. Friday, it will be the Hot Frogs Jumping Jazz Band and a Cajun appetizer buffet; at 6 p.m. Saturday, the Blue Street Jazz Band and a Southern picnic buffet, and at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Igor's Jazz Cowboys and a Western brunch buffet. A pass for all three concerts is $50. Individually, tickets are $15 Friday, $20 Saturday and $20 Sunday. Information: (800) 624-5572. The inn is at 400 Alisal Road.

*

The Real Life documentary series at UC Santa Barbara's Isla Vista Theater will conclude Friday with "Dialogues With Madwomen," a look into the lives of seven women and their struggles with schizophrenia, manic-depression, euphoria and multiple personality disorders. The women tell their own stories with the help of home movies, photos, and enactments of dreams and memories. The film, which won the Sundance Film Festival's 1994 Spirit of Freedom Award, will begin at 7 p.m. General admission is $5 at the door. The theater is at 960 Embarcadero del Norte.

*

Violinist Corey Cerovsek will be the guest soloist when the Santa Barbara Symphony presents its second concert program of the season Saturday and Sunday at the Arlington Theatre. Conductor Gisele Ben-Dor will lead the ensemble in Dvorak's "Carnival Overture," Wieniawski's Violin Concerto No. 2, Paganini's "Fantasia on the G string" and Copland's Symphony No. 3. Concert times are 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets range from $15 to $34 Saturday and $14 to $25 Sunday. Information: 965-6596. The Arlington is at 1317 State St.

*

If you like flutes, you may want to visit UCSB's Music Building from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday for the Santa Barbara Flute Fiesta. There will be workshops, master classes and a 1 p.m. concert at the Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall. Admission is free. Information: 893-3230.

*

Winning entries from Westmont College's fourth annual " Un Ange Passe --An Angel Passes" art contest will be on display at the Reynolds Gallery at the college Monday through Dec. 14. An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Regular gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. The college is at 955 La Paz Road, Santa Barbara. Information: 565-6161.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|