Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollections

The Peace That Never Came : France's acrobatic self-delusion kept its people believing, until the very last moment that nobody, Hitler included, wanted war : THE HOLLOW YEARS: France in the 1930s, By Eugen Weber (Norton: $25; 352 pp.)

November 20, 1994|Denis Hollier | Denis Hollier, Professor of French at Yale University, is the editor of "The College of Sociology: 1937-1939" (University of Minnesota Press) and of "Against Architecture: The Writings of Georges Bataille" (MIT Press)

Eugen Weber's new book, "The Hollow Years," is a pitiless account of France in the 1930s, a decade that, if it is anything but glorious, has nevertheless something inescapably fascinating about it. It offers a painful case study of a society bringing itself almost willingly under a spell. But, however depressing, this story suggests that in France even the most Dostoevskyan tragedies can be made into farcical Offenbachian operettas.

The only redeeming episode in these "Hollow Years," for example, is the Popular Front government's implementation of paid vacations. (The government's only successful division, Weber claims, was "Le Ministere des Loisirs," an expression which, with a particularly American condescension--Weber is Romanian--he translates as the Ministry of Idleness.)

That was in 1936. The French would have fared far better had they spent time thinking about Hitler and Nazi expansionism rather than about holidays. Roger Caillois, a young sociologist at the time, was struck by the lethal untimeliness of such a concern. In one of the lectures he gave at the College of Sociology, he wondered what could be happening to a civilization whose bottom line, even on the eve of war in 1939, was a refusal to mandate an expansion of working hours in plants that were involved in the national defense. (By the way, the word vacation comes, as one knows, from vacuum : it refers to a kind of hollow time, a time of committed demobilization.)

True, glory and great leaders are no longer the stuff of historians. Following the trend initiated in the '30s by the Annales school, to which Eugene Weber pays due homage, historical narration emphasizes contexts, replacing individuals with common men, events with daily life, proper names with statistics. However, the absence of great men in "The Hollow Years" is not merely the result of a methodological choice. Did France suffer from having no Hitler, no Lenin or Stalin, no F.D.R., not even a Mussolini or a Franco? She clearly, at times, felt that way. The title of Weber's book refers, among others, to a dramatic emptiness of the seats of power.

It also refers to other vacant zones. 140,000 soldiers had died, leaving an equal number of empty (or half-empty) beds. France had broken the world record in widows. Moreover, the war effort had been fed by foreign (mostly American) loans whose repayment would mortgage the coming decades, adding a financial vacuum to the demographic one. France thus became dependent on America for money, and on immigration for manpower. Having been fought, mostly, on French territory, war also caused immense civil destruction. France was exhausted by a victory that was beyond her means. Hence the impatience of the annees folles (crazy years): no sooner was the Versailles treaty drafted, than the French rushed to celebrate the end of war, not waiting to hear that an accounting error had been made. They never totally believed in their victory--and they were right not to. The years that were to end with a phony war started with a phony peace.

In a deeper sense, hollowness refers to a lack of direction, a sense of purposelessness. Psychiatrists describe moments where one loses a sense of time. The past, it seems, is still to come, while the future has the discouraging flavor of deja vu. So, while the reader of "The Hollow Years" is offered a picturesque mix of anecdotes and statistics, one senses, crawling, looming behind, the menacing presence of war. It is everywhere, like the figure in the carpet. But is it behind or in front? More and more, that became the French people's question. They didn't know which way things were moving. Were they moving away from or ahead, toward war? Was war receding or approaching? No wonder so many artists of the time were inspired by the theme of the labyrinth, and the legendary figures associated with it, Theseus and the Minotaur.

This feeling of a lack of direction was reflected in the way they named their time. For what followed war was not peace but post-war, l'apres-guerre, which lasted 10 years. And, when the decade closed, 1930 was celebrated as the end of the postwar, "la fin de l'apres-guerre." After war and postwar thus came post-postwar, which, typically, was a way of saying war without saying it. Some French people might still have thought that they had won the war, none would claim they had won the peace. In fact, by the mid-30s, almost everyone had discovered the period's real name, entre-deux-guerres. Like a river in the desert's sands, war had gone underground. The hollow years were just a creepy intermission.

Advertisement
Los Angeles Times Articles
|
|
|