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Prime-Time Flicks

November 20, 1994|Kevin Thomas

The 1991 The Last Boy Scout (ABC Sunday at 9 p.m.), which indulges in macho daydreaming with a vengeance, is one of those movies that wants to keep you bouncing off your seat. It's a crash-a-thon about two misfit heroes who meet, woo each other with wisecracks, kill a lot of guys and then go into business together. (The misfits are Bruce Willis' weathered private eye and Damon Wayans' pro quarterback banned for gambling and drugs and whose girlfriend has just been killed.)

Gone With the Wind (KTLA Monday at 7 p.m., concluding Tuesday at 8 p.m.), the most beloved of all American movies, is back again. The Civil War epic offers a perfect cast headed by Vivien Leigh as that great survivor, Scarlett O'Hara, and Clark Gable as Rhett Butler, the most honorable of rakes.

Mary Poppins (KTLA Wednesday a 7 p.m.) is Walt Disney's charming 1964 musical fantasy about a nanny possessed with supernatural powers who descends on a family in Edwardian England. Julie Andrews won an Oscar in her film debut in the title role. Dick Van Dyke co-stars.

The 1992 blockbuster Home Alone (NBC Thursday at 8 p.m.) makes one wonder how closely a movie can resemble a cartoon and still be called a movie. Macauley Culkin became famous overnight as the 7-year-old upstart accidentally left behind by his vacationing family to fend for himself against a bumbling pair of burglars (Joe Pesci, Daniel Stern).

Beethoven (KTTV Friday at 8 p.m.) is a medium-level 1992 comedy about a lovable St. Bernard, a dog-loving family and a dog-phobic dad (Charles Grodin). It's a consciously naive movie--big, bright, cartoonish--but there's some feeling to it involving how pets humanize uptight suburbanites.

On Golden Pond (KABC Saturday at 9 p.m.) expresses eloquently a dream that many of us share: to grow old, but never less passionate, alongside the person one has loved most dearly. The dream couple, Norman and Ethel Thayer as played unforgettably by Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn, have no defense against the frights and confusions of age or the nearness of death. Another key element in the drama is an unresolved relationship between Norman and his daughter, played by Fonda's real-life daughter Jane.

With Metropolitan (KCET Saturday at 9 p.m.) debuting writer-director Whit Stillman scored a success with this incisive 1990 romantic comedy of manners among the young, very rich and social in Manhattan. Stillman's alter ego (Edward Clements) is an outsider of sorts by way of diminished financial status, and he's as repelled as he is attracted by his friends.

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