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EDUCATION BRIEFS

February 16, 1995

CLAREMONT: Harvey Mudd College has received a Special Opportunity Award of $729,190 from the Whitaker Foundation to advance teaching and research in biomedical engineering.

MONROVIA: More than two-thirds of Monrovia Unified School District parents voted Feb. 1 in favor of mandatory school uniforms for elementary and middle school students beginning in September. The district began considering uniforms after a state law went into effect Jan. 1 allowing districts to make them a requirement. Parents who voted in favor of the uniforms cited security concerns and wanted schools to be able to target non-students who come on campus and to track truant students. The district has not decided on a design yet. Uniform costs will be covered by parents and the district will provide them for those students who cannot afford them.

MONTEREY PARK: Seventh-grade students at Monterey Highlands School will present a free science symposium on endangered species from 1:30 to 3 p.m. on Feb. 23. The symposium, "The Biodiversity of Southern California's Endangered Species--Can They Be Saved?" is aimed at developing students' awareness of the environment, encouraging them to address critical concerns and promoting leadership. It will be held in the school cafeteria, 400 Casuda Canyon Drive.

POMONA: In affiliation with President Clinton's AmeriCorps program, 53 members of the Cal Poly Pomona PolyCorps began fanning out last month into communities where they will help at-risk youth with conflict resolution skills, construct affordable housing in low-income neighborhoods and assist existing volunteer agencies.

SAN DIMAS: Two hundred Bonita Unified School District teachers picketed outside the Feb. 8 board meeting. Sheriff's deputies were called by the board, contending the noisy teachers were disturbing the peace. No arrests were made. The teachers are in a dispute with the district over their salaries. Teachers have not received a raise in four years and are asking for an 8% salary increase. The district's most recent offer was a 2% raise.

WEST COVINA: The City Council passed an ordinance allowing police to issue citations to local students ages 12 to 17 who are caught unsupervised while school is in session. If ticketed, the student must appear in Juvenile Traffic Court with a parent or guardian where they will face a fine or community service obligation. The law went into effect Feb. 1.

WEST COVINA: The West Covina Unified School District board voted to reopen Hollencrest Middle School, which closed in 1988 when the district faced a $2.5-million budget deficit. During the past four years, enrollment in the district has increased by 1,000 students and an additional 250 are expected next year. Edgewood Middle School, with 1,839 students, is the only middle school in the district currently open.

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